New answers tagged

1

Arrive whithin a year = almost surely already within the heliosphere. I assume a stellar remnant black hole (bigger ones will be even more noticeable, smaller ones are still unknown). It will be a rather bright shiny x-ray source in the sky (we do have enough matter around to support a bright accretion disk). It will distort our outer planet's orbits for ...


1

A black hole approaching our solar system would have been detected hundred of years in advance due to nearby stars shifting position, although it's true nature wouldn't be known until decades ago, when the concept of black holes was first postulated and then confirmed. Even if the black hole were to enter the solar system, rather then pass nearby it, it ...


1

Here is a brief explanation of the various techniques that can be used to detect exoplanets. The scatter plot suggests that for a planet to be detected by direct imaging, it has to have (roughly speaking) an orbit as large as Jupiter's, and a mass as great as Jupiter's. So Jupiter looks like the best candidate. As for your second question, the declination of ...


3

Both statements are correct: aperture is the most important factor, and many large aperture telescopes are resold due to lack of use. The brightness of any object you observe is determined by the aperture of the telescope ("light grasp"). With larger objects, such as planets, the aperture also determines the resolution: the amount of detail you're ...


7

In Observing Handbook and Catalogue of Deep-Sky Objects, Luginbuhl and Skiff describe how hundreds of deep-sky objects look in different apertures. For example, for galaxy M63 (NGC 5055) in Canes Venatici: Messier 63 is an easy object for 6 cm, located 3'.5 E and a bit S of a mag. 8.5 star. It is elongated E-W, passing just S of the star. The broadly ...


8

In addition to the target list linked to by @planetmaker in their answer, there are two recently published review articles (from Nature Astronomy) summarizing the many different aspects of Solar System science that were done with Spitzer: Lisse et al. (2020), "Spitzer's Solar System studies of comets, centaurs and Kuiper belt objects" Trilling et ...


14

All "big" instruments have observation logs, so does Spitzer. The complete logs are here but there's also a filtered log for solar system observations which shows basically all planets and especially many minor planets. That said, it's not a general sky survey telescope due to its FOV of 5' x 5', so it's not meant to discover objects in ...


Top 50 recent answers are included