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Though we may calculate the position of the barycenter of the Sun and the Mercury also in the same manner as we calculate the position of the barycenter of the Earth and the Moon as shown in the following diagram; we can’t calculate the position of the barycenter of the Sun and the Earth in the same manner. [Method of calculating the position of the ...


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NASA Photojournal item PIA17936 says: Researchers used the left eye camera of Curiosity's Mast Camera (Mastcam) to capture this scene about 80 minutes after sunset on the 529th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Jan. 31, 2014). Between sols 528 and 532, Where is Curiosity? shows it in a place called Dingo Gap at Martian longitude 137.41°, ...


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Earth's rotation is slowing down, but it's a little bit irregular, which is why leap seconds can't be predicted in advance. There's provision for negative leap seconds, but they've never been used. You can get the current list of leap seconds, maintained by The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), at https://www.ietf.org/timezones/data/leap-seconds.list ...


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The motions of the Sun, the planets and their moons and everything else in the solar system are well described by Newton's laws of motion and gravity (with some minor relativistic corrections needed to fully account e.g. for the perihelion precession of Mercury). These laws make absolutely no reference to a "barycenter" in any form, so the whole ...


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The Sun's movement in the Solar System can be thought of as its movement around all the individual pairwise barycenters at once, or as a movement around the Solar System barycenter, which itself is constantly moving. Suppose Mercury was the only planet. The mutual barycenter of Mercury and the Sun is about 10km from the center of the Sun, which is inside the ...


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The short answer is no; there is only one barycenter. Yes, you can count the Sun/Jupiter barycenter or the Sun/Saturn barycenter, or whichever barycenter you want, but the net effect of all Solar System bodies is to be considered when you calculate the actual barycenter of the Solar System. (And yes, that would include counting all the small asteroids and ...


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Almost certainly not. All available information seems to indicate that the Earth will probably not reverse it's spin direction before it ends. However, we don't have absolute certainty of this. Inner-planetary collisions There are numerical simulations indicating the "Existence of collisional trajectories of Mercury, Mars, and Venus with Earth" ...


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TL;DR: Because light doesn't travel at an infinite speed. Light travels at exactly 299,792,458 meters per second, and one AU is equal to 149,597,870,700 meters. Therefore, it takes about 500 seconds, or 8 minutes and 20 seconds, for light to travel from the Sun to Earth.


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There is a lot of confusion in those articles. The headline though is The Earth won't start rotating backwards and The sun won't rise in the West Yes Mars and the other planets do move retrograde against the stars. This happens once every year-and-a-bit, and is a perspective effect. The Earth moves faster than Mars and so it can overtake it. When Earth ...


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No, the Earth will not start to rotate in the opposite direction. Ever. The reason Earth maintains its direction of rotation is conservation of angular momentum. Just like a moving body resists changes in velocity because it has linear momentum, a rotating body will resist forces that try to change its rotation state. Angular momentum can be moved around in ...


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Does the earth spiral around the sun's path as it is shown in the video (exact time is 19:49) and screenshots? The Earth does spiral around the Sun's path, but not quite as it's shown in the video. It isn't clear if the video accounts for the 60 degree tilt of the Solar System with respect to the galactic plane. The sizes and distances are not to scale. ...


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Is the helical or spiral model shown in the video real or just a theory. It's sort-of real but not necessarily the way it's shown. The Earth orbits the Sun in roughly a circle, and the solar system is moving relative to the center of the galaxy in roughly a straight line (on the time scale of thousands of years and more) but those squiggles shown ...


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TL;DR: about 5 times current eccentricity for a deviation by 5 degrees from the mean... but the devil is in the celestial mechanics and climate model details. It would not quite work, because the length of seasons would be uneven. Currently Earth's north and south hemispheres get nearly exactly as much or little sunlight as the other. But on the eccentric ...


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