13 votes
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Why is Enceladus's albedo greater than 1?

To answer this, one really has to understand how the geometric and bond albedos are defined. Let's start with the bond albedo since its simpler. Bond Albedo The Bond Albedo is just the fraction of ...
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9 votes
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Why the Circumstellar Habitable Zone is defined as it is, if life could be possible outside of it?

From your first link, the definition is: "The circumstellar habitable zone (CHZ), or simply the habitable zone, is the range of orbits around a star within which a planetary surface can support ...
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7 votes
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Why is Enceladus the only geologically active moon among its neighbours?

This puzzle is something called the Mimas paradox. The two bodies are nearly twins, but Mimas is substantially less active than Enceladus. There are currently several proposed solutions: Mimas cooled ...
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4 votes

Could Enceladus be too salty to support life?

Limitations to life via osmosis is mostly a modern limitation. Modern in the 'geological era'-sense. Why osmosis can affect life negatively is, very roughly, when concentration gradients past a bi-...
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4 votes

Could Enceladus be too salty to support life?

I actually found this very useful article, which seems to answer the question: https://phys.org/news/2021-05-salty-enceladus-ocean-ice.html It suggests that the liquid water in the Enceladus ocean has ...
3 votes

Enceladus; why use the words "geysers", "jets", and "plumes" interchangeably?

A geyser is a water volcano, they are familiar and fairly common on Earth. By analogy, a water volcano on other planets can also be called a geyser, although the mechanism may be rather different. ...
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3 votes

Enceladus; why use the words "geysers", "jets", and "plumes" interchangeably?

Question: I would know why the words "geysers" and "jets" would be used interchangeably. Is this because it hasn't been confirmed yet what they are, and the authors don't wish to ...
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3 votes

Do Enceladus' geysers fall back to its surface or do they achieve escape velocity?

We start by calculating the moon Enceladus surface escape velocity $v_e$ as $$v_e=\sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}}$$ where $G = 6.674×10^{-11}m^3kg^{-1}s^{-2}$ is the universal gravitational constant, $M=1.08×10^{...
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2 votes
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Light levels on other celestial bodies

You don't need to do it that complicated. The sunlight's spectrum is the same everywhere in the solar system. And in order to get the light intensity, you can simply apply the inverse square law that ...
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