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1

In a nutshell, we are asked whether we are aware that the linked paper was peered reviewed (« complex review »), and if yes, what is the scientific consensus (« opinion of most scientists") on the conclusions of said paper. From this interpretation of the question, I would say that it is a valid one (not falling into the « opinion-based » category) for ...


0

This question has been given a vote to close because it is opinion-based. I think that the best way to describe questions such as this is that scholarly opinion varies widely, ranging from the rare Earth hypothesis, which says that life (and in particular, intelligent life) is extremely rare, to its opposing hypothesis, which says that life is very common (e....


3

I'm pretty sure it's restricted to the near-IR, with the shortest wavelengths being $Y$-band or $J$-band (i.e., 1 or 1.2 microns) and the longest being $L$-band (i.e., 3.8 microns). This is probably because 1) classical adaptive optics systems use the optical for corrections that are applied in the near-IR (for reasons I discussed in this answer); and 2) ...


7

The spike would be due to the release of a "final" catalogue of Exoplanet candidates discovered in the main Kepler mission, which was issued in July 2015. This list was vetted and a catalogue of about 1300 very likely exoplanets was released by NASA in May 2016. Observations of the Kepler main field ceased much earlier in 2013, but after that the ...


0

Almost commented, but got too long... this is an anecdotal/layman type answer to attempt to compliment the other specific, informational(good), answers. So just on a really basic note; if there aren't any other large objects nearby/between them, what else would you expect to happen? Not to oversimplify but isn't this just a 'matter' of relativity.We expect ...


17

2B or not 2b? That is the question. The published paper - Zhang et al. (2021) - defines COCONUTS 2b as an exoplanet based upon the mass-ratio of 2b/2A, which is of order 0.02. I think this is a bit arbitrary and it just looks like a wide, low-mass binary system, with a secondary that is a low-mass brown dwarf ($\sim 10 M_{\rm Jupiter}$). As the authors say, ...


8

There are two major theories for the formation of wide-orbit exoplanets. This is discussed here: https://www.exoplanets.ed.ac.uk/news/formation-of-planets-on-wide-orbits The first major theory is called GI (Gravitational Instability). The theory is that a protoplanetary disk could fragment. Then the fragment could coalesce separately through gravitational ...


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