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Go to the exoplanets.org database. Top left hand dropdown menu - select "Stars" You get a table listing all the known stars with exoplanets. Click on the big plus sign in the top right hand of the table and select "Binary Flag" This will now show a boolean flag that indicates if the star is known to be part of a binary (or multiple) system. In the ...


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It depends on how you define Jupiter analogues. There are several possible factors, including mass, eccentricity and orbital period cutoffs. Given there's no consistent definition, comparison of results between the various papers is difficult. For example, the recent paper by Wittenmyer et al. considers "cool Jupiters" to be planets with masses greater than ...


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A recent study indicates that Cold Jupiters similar to Saturn and Jupiter greatly outnumber Hot Jupiters. The authors studied 18 years worth of data to find long-period exoplanets, that is planets far from their host star. Cold Jupiters, being farther from their host star, have longer periods than Hot Jupiters. Therefore, they need to be observed over a ...


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The article you link to refers to Borsato et al. 2019, which attempted to rectify discrepancies in the measured properties of planets in the Kepler-9 system between transit timing variation measurements and radial velocity measurements. They arrived at $\rho\sim0.31^{+0.05}_{-0.06}\text{ g cm}^{-3}$ for Kepler-9c. However, Borsato et al.'s Figure 10 shows ...


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That was likely the latest StarLink satellite constellation. Note that usually it is important to give an exact time and place to answer questions like this, but in this case the answer looks fairly obvious. It really does look odd to see the constellation fly overhead (later it will disperse into separate orbits and not be very conspicuous).


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