25 votes

Is there physical evidence to distinguish between the expansion of space and an anthropocentric universe?

I'm looking for some kind of observable evidence (that has been observed, or could be observed in the future) that could falsify one or the other theory. You seem to be requiring one (very high) ...
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22 votes

Are there any galaxies which fell out of sight horizon due to cosmic expansion?

No. In fact the opposite is the case. (See the last paragraph for an intuitive explanation.) It is a common misbelief that galaxies receding faster than the speed of light are not visible to us. ...
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  • 32.3k
20 votes
Accepted

In km/h, what actually is the "speed" of Andromeda away from us: cosmologically?

The rate of expansion, measured in the customary units of (km/s)/Megaparsec is not known with great accuracy. Recent measurements include 67.6 (SDSS-III), 73(HST) 67.8 (Plank) 69.3 (WMAP) [wikipedia] ...
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  • 88.7k
20 votes
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Will we start seeing galaxies disappear due to Universe expansion?

It is a common misconception that galaxies receding faster than light cannot be observed. There are two versions of this misconception: Galaxies that are now receding faster than light cannot be seen....
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  • 32.3k
13 votes

Could there really be a preferential direction to the speed of light?

Prior to Einstein's 1905 paper, the Lorentz transformation had already been worked out by Lorentz and others. Only their interpretation of it was lacking. They still clung to the idea that there was a ...
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  • 2,065
12 votes
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How does the concept of a universe with no center work?

When we talk about the universe, we are really talking about one of two things: The observable universe, which is everything we can possibly see. The Universe, which is everything that has ever ...
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12 votes
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Local neighbourhood and Superclusters

Structure formation Structure in the Universe — galaxies, galaxy groups, clusters, and superclusters — forms from regions of the Universe which are denser than the average; dense enough the overcome ...
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  • 32.3k
11 votes
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Where does the energy of light go, when it red-shifts?

The problem is that conservation of energy is a slippery concept in General Relativity. There are arguments back and forth but most people accept that conservation of energy is only a local law - it ...
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  • 115k
11 votes
Accepted

How far would EGSY8p7 be away now?

30.4 billion lightyears. The current distance — i.e. the distance that one would measure if we froze the Universe and started laying out measuring rods — is called the proper distance, or physical ...
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  • 32.3k
11 votes
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If we could fly off edge of observable universe what would happen?

The 'edge' of the observable universe is as much a edge as is the 'edge' of how far you can look from the roof of your house: none at all, it's just a limit to our vision. We can never reach this edge ...
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10 votes
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How many galaxies disappear beyond the Hubble Bubble horizon every year now?

This is a tricky question to answer, because it has some false and imprecise assumptions baked into it. The short version is: I don't know at what rate stuff is currently crossing the cosmic Event ...
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  • 311
10 votes
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If an object 1 billion light years away emits light, does it take more than 1 billion years to reach us because of the expansion of the universe?

Yes, in the time it takes light — or, in this case, gravitational waves (GWs) from the black hole merger event GW190521 — to travel from a source to an observer, the Universe expands, thus increasing ...
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  • 32.3k
9 votes
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When the universe expands does it create new space, matter, or something else?

Yes, space is constantly being created. The new space does not hold any matter (like atoms) or dark matter. This means that the density of normal and dark matter decreases at the same rate as the ...
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  • 32.3k
9 votes
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Evolution of the Hubble parameter

The solution to the Friedmann equation in a flat universe is $$H^2 = \frac{8\pi G}{3}\rho + \frac{\Lambda}{3},$$ where $\rho$ is the matter density (including dark matter) and $\Lambda$ is the ...
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  • 115k
9 votes

Is there any proof of space being created?

This is an intriguing proposition, but I would ask how your hypothesis explains that the universe appears to be flat? That is with $\Omega_M + \Omega_\Lambda = 1$. The evidence for this comes from ...
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  • 115k
9 votes
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Are there other proofs of the expanding universe apart from the redshift?

Yes, there is direct, non-red-shift evidence of expansion. The past temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) has been directly measured and found to be substantially higher ...
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  • 1,171
9 votes
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Is the eventual heat death of the universe due to the expansion of the universe?

As far as I understand it, the heat death of the universe is a consequence of entropy, not expansion. All processes result in the shifting of some energy to higher entropy. Though the observable ...
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  • 6,084
9 votes
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Cosmological redshift vs doppler redshift

After considering @benrg's comments, I realize that my first answer contained too strong statements about the relation between the two redshifts. I try here to moderate my answer, but you might want ...
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  • 32.3k
9 votes

Is the age of the Universe really 13.8 billion years?

The age of the universe is not calculated based on the size of the visible universe. The age of the universe is being calculated based on the fact that the laws of nature have no direction. This means ...
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  • 763
9 votes

Is there physical evidence to distinguish between the expansion of space and an anthropocentric universe?

I think StephenG is right, but I will mention one counterfactual. Suppose we observed no galaxies more than a billion light-years away, as determined by their red shifts. Say they were roughly ...
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  • 2,525
8 votes
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Will gravitational waves too far away ever reach us?

The answer here is very similar to if you were asking about light. In principle gravitational waves might allow us to fractions of a second after the big bang. Electromagnetic waves can see back to ...
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  • 115k
8 votes

Are there any galaxies which fell out of sight horizon due to cosmic expansion?

As time passes, there are galaxies that are currently not in the observable universe which will become observable But this is not a sudden winking on. Instead, over hundreds of millions of years we ...
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  • 88.7k
8 votes
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How is the Universe's Expansion Accelerating if the Hubble Constant is Decreasing?

The Hubble parameter is defined as the rate of change of the distance between two points in the universe, divided by the distance between those two points. The Hubble parameter is getting smaller ...
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  • 115k
8 votes

Can the diminishing energy of the CMBR be the source of dark energy?

No - the decreasing energy in the CMB is already well modeled in the Friedmann equations. The term in the density parameter that is proportional to $a^{-4}$ is the contribution of radiation energy ...
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  • 2,846
8 votes

Does the accelerating expansion of the Universe contradict Hubble's law?

The Hubble law gives the velocity of a distant galaxy right now. A galaxy at a distance $d$ recedes at a velocity $v = H_0\,d$ right now$^\dagger$. However, the relation between $d$ and the redshift —...
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  • 32.3k
8 votes
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Why does the Supernova 2006cm give a very different value for the Hubble constant? Why doesn't it increase error bars for the Hubble constant?

At a distance of $d = 87\,\mathrm{Mpc}$, with a Hubble constant of roughly $H_0 = 70\,\mathrm{km}\,\mathrm{s}^{-1}\,\mathrm{Mpc}^{-1}$ cosmological expansion should make the host galaxy UGC 11723 ...
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  • 32.3k
8 votes
Accepted

Why is the Cosmic Microwave Background evidence of for a hotter, denser early Universe?

By request: Beyond the fact that the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a direct prediction of the big bang model, there is the question of how you would produce it in any other way. It is ...
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  • 115k
8 votes
Accepted

In an isolated binary system, can the expansion of the universe balance out collapsing orbit due to gravitational waves?

There is no locally measurable force associated with the Hubble expansion. The short reason is in ProfRob's comment: "the little piece of the universe you are considering doesn't obey the ...
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  • 2,065
8 votes

Is there physical evidence to distinguish between the expansion of space and an anthropocentric universe?

I would like to point out another flaw in the question: the model "everything moves away from us proportionally to its distance" is not actually anthropocentric in a basic approximation. Let'...
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  • 181
8 votes

Is there physical evidence to distinguish between the expansion of space and an anthropocentric universe?

I'm not clear what, in this anthropocentric picture, explains the cosmic microwave background? Are we to suppose there is a large, spherical shell of optically thick gas expanding away from us faster ...
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  • 115k

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