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2

You are correct that M81 transits the meridian at upper culmination just past mid-February in the eastern US. As long as the Moon is well below the horizon, as it will be in Feb. 2020, this will be the best time to observe M81, and its neighbor, M82. Since these galaxies are relatively bright, good views are available from late December through early May ...


8

There are no naked eye galaxies in Orion. The brightest galaxies in Orion are NGC1924 (a magnitude 13 barred spiral, 130 million lightyear distant) and IC421 (a magnitude 14 spiral that hosted a supernova visible in 2013, 150 million ly distant) In the neighbouring constellation of Eriandus is NGC1600 (a large elliptical galaxy with magnitude 12 with an ...


11

The short answer is there are no galaxies in or around Orion that are visible to the naked eye. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) has some simplified star charts for each constellation. The charts show galaxies the brightest galaxies that are visible in amateur telescopes as red ovals. The chart for Orion and the surrounding constellations show no ...


7

We don't really know what the statistics are for the frequency of solar systems is as a function of stellar density and many such systems in dense regions may be disrupted by close encounters with another star. What I surmise you want is an estimate of the density of stars as a function of Galactocentric radius. In the solar neighbourhood, there are 378 ...


5

The axis type ‘FELO’ is regularly gridded in frequency but expressed in velocity units in the optical convention. The unit here is $m/s$. This means that the wavelength/frequency has already been expressed as velocity corresponding to a Doppler shift around a reference wavelength. This velocity is given by $$ v = c \ \frac{\lambda - \lambda_0}{\lambda_0 ...


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