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4

Here are some galaxies (in the first line), and the same galaxies a bit later (in the second line) If you are in the red galaxy (the one in the middle), galaxies that used to be one space away are now two spaces away, so they are moving away with a speed of one space per unit time. Galaxies that used to be two spaces away are now four spaces away, so they ...


0

another way to think about this is to imagine what some magic observer expanding with the universe would see they see galaxies as (mostly) fixed in place - with some small individual random motion - but those galaxies, and everything within them, appears to be getting smaller this frame of reference is what we call the comoving frame and we use it a lot in ...


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Think about it as if you were baking bread (or cake, whatever you prefer). When you bake a bread with raisins, it rises in all directions (due to the yeast). Every raisin in a rising loaf of raisin bread will see every other raisin expanding away from it. Now suppose the raisins as galaxies and the yeast as the Hubble constant. An illustration from ...


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No. The solar system is a gravitationally bound system so it is unaffected by the large scale expansion of the universe - see this Wikipedia article for further explanation. Similarly, galaxies like the Milky Way, and even groups of galaxies such as the Local Group, which includes the Milky Way and Andromeda, are gravitationally bound systems and are also ...


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The short answer is: No, there doesn't seem to be any nickname in use; it's just referred to as "IC 1101" (which is pretty easy to write and say; I'd argue it's better than "UGC 09752" or "PGC 054167", which are among the 52 other names listed for it by the NASA Extragalactic Database). It's also sometimes referred to as "...


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Summary: Small telescopes will not show any visual detail in a galaxy. The website What Can You See With Different Telescopes is a good reference. (Thanks to JamesK for referencing this website in a comment to Is the Celestron astromaster 130 EQ Model able to see nebulas and galaxies?) Keep in mind that observing an object visually is much different than ...


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The SIMBAD page for the source in question: EQ J095552.5+694045.4 From the list of references, the most relevant ones to this question appear to be as follows: Joseph et al. (2011) suggest that the object could be a microquasar similar to SS 433, which has a high radio to X-ray luminosity ratio. Gendre et al. (2013) argue against a supernova ...


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