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All models of gamma-ray bursts involve extremely energetic phenomena: particular types of supernovae, the coalescence of binary compact objects, strong magnetar flares, or tidal disruption events. It turns out that these events are quite rare - so rare, in fact, that GRBs would be expected to occur in a low-redshift Milky Way-like galaxy at a rate of only ...


16

Faster than light's answer is fine if the gamma ray burst is "pointing" towards us. The emission from rapidly moving material in a GRB is thought to be beamed in the direction of that motion, along the rotation axis of the progenitor object in fact. The opening angle of the beam may only be a few degrees (e.g. Frail et al. 2001), which would mean ...


13

The paper (section 5.1) discusses three possibilities in the context of a relativistic fireball model, where some of the kinetic energy in relativistic jets of material emerging from the explosion is converted into gamma rays. The gravitational wave emission is always "prompt" since any surrounding material is transparent to gravitational waves. In ...


11

Short answer: We're screwed. Long answer: Using the inverse square law, the apparent magnitude of the GRB would be about -36.51, which is about 8091 times brighter than the Sun. That's amazing, but no one would be there to witness it. Earth would be completely roasted, with all life destroyed by the deadly radiation. The ozone layer would also be destroyed, ...


8

Long and short GRBs are thought to arise from different types of event, involving different types of star. Therefore the question you should be asking is why are their event rates so similar?! Long duration bursts are thought to be produced in the death throes of rapidly, rotating massive stars - the hypernova model. Short GRBs are thought to be produced ...


2

I will answer with what I now believe to be the correct answer. We see some gamma-ray burst emission hit our satellite which carries an amount of energy $E_{obs}$. If we say the burst was emitted equally in all directions (isotropic) then we derive a quantity $E_{iso}$. If we say that the burst was actually emitted in a tight beam then we derive $E_\theta$ ...


1

Although not being an expert on the field, I found a multitude of studies dealing with events which may be used as indicator that a GBR is about to happen somewhere. Research on GBR precusor events range from smaller gamma ray precursors, over gravitiational waves, to thermal signatures, and neutrinos: Sarp Akcay: Forecasting Gamma-Ray Bursts using ...


1

I found a database that contains all GRBs from April 1991-August 1991. However, it has 1637 registered GRBs so it would probably be enough for your purposes. Here is the link-Goddard Space Center GRB Archive. Also, just a fair warning, that website is incredibly old and very difficult to use, it took me nearly fifteen minutes to navigate to the actual ...


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