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In an isothermal atmosphere, the exponential scale height of the atmosphere is $$ h \sim \frac{k_\mathrm B T}{\mu g},$$ where $g$ is the gravitational field, $\mu$ is the mean mass of a particle and $T$ is the temperature (in kelvin). i.e. The pressure/density of the atmosphere falls exponentially, with an e-folding height given by the above expression. I ...


21

There are two common definitions in use for the surface of gas planets: The 1-bar surface: As pressure increases, the deeper in we go into the gas planet, we will hit a pressure of 1 bar at some altitude. Gas at this altitudes will usually sit deep enough in the gravitational well and be of a near-uniform density and temperature, as to not be influenced by ...


4

The Kepler-20 system has planets with masses in the following order, going outwards from the star: Kepler 20b: $\approx 10 M_\oplus$ Kepler 20e: $\approx M_\oplus$ Kepler 20c: $\approx 16 M_\oplus$ Kepler 20f: $\approx 1.5 M_\oplus$ Kepler 20g: $\approx 20 M_\oplus$ Kepler 20d: $< 20 M_\oplus$ If Wikipedia is to be believed, Kepler 20b may be a ...


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