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Gas giants don't emit radiation, they reflect it. Due to their mixed composition, there is different amounts of light absorbed in different ways, giving them their distinct colours. Stars on the other hand glow because of the energy that is produced at their core, and their composition is almost purely hydrogen. So because of their high temperature, and ...


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The atoms in stars have disassociated electrons at random distances, they are ionised, and the energy converted to light is at a continuous spectrum of wavelegnths and colors. The heaviest elements with a potential for color fall into the star. Color bands from stars come from colder atoms in the high corona, which can cool and have fixed electron orbits ...


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Just rotation is the wrong tree to bark up on. You see color variations on gas giants due to differences in composition, i.e. ammonia vs. sulfuric acid clouds on Jupiter, which are transported differently on the rotating planet in the up/downwelling bands. Spots on stars originate due to very different physics. At the temperatures which are prevalent on ...


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Prelude It is now generally accepted in the planet formation community that planets form as a side-product of the star formation process in so-called protoplanetary discs. Protoplanetary discs have initial masses of few to tens of percent of their stellar host masses, are relatively cold (T<150K in about 95% or more of their mass, which is outside the ...


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