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Not really my area, but this question is probably related to the planetary migration in circumstellar disks. In this case, the migration is caused by gravitational interactions between the planet and the gas in the disk. There are two explanations for this effect Impulse approximation: consider a parcel of gas in the corrotating frame. If the gas is close ...


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They know there's molecular gas because they observed emission from the CO molecule in two of the previously identified (atomic-hydrogen-emitting) gas clouds. From the paper: ... we targeted two objects (hereafter, MW-C1 and MW-C2), highlighted by red boxes in Fig. 1, in the 12CO(2 → 1) emission line at 230.538 GHz with the 12-m Atacama Pathfinder ...


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Yes, a blueshift here would mean relative to the systemic velocity of the galaxy - which means that, relative to the galaxy, the material is moving at least partly in the direction of Earth. In many cases the outflow may be a pair of jets being ejected in opposite directions out of the nucleus of the galaxy, but we are less likely to see absorption lines ...


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A gravitating object in a disk creates a wake on the inner edge of its orbit as well on the outer edge of its orbit. The inner wake is the leading wake, while the outer wake is trailing. The torques created by these two wakes would cancel, if the disk had no shear. Yet disks in astrophysical contexts are subject to Keplerian shear - and thus the torques ...


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The light that we receive from space contains a lot of information. Specifically, because of quantum nature of molecules and atoms, theses small species absorb light at very specific wavelengths.Each molecule, atom or ion has a unique set of absorption features. Think of it as the molecule own fingerprint. Hence, if we look at a star or a hot gas, we can ...


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