16 votes

Does the escape velocity formula take into account how a gravitationally bound object's distance to its primary increases before coming back down?

The escape speed is defined in Newtonian physics simply by demanding that the sum of kinetic energy at launch (ballistically, with no power applied thereafter) and gravitational potential energy at ...
ProfRob's user avatar
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14 votes
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What is the force responsible for the output of whiteholes?

White holes are time-reversed black holes. For a black hole, a particle may fall in with a trajectory that terminates at the singularity. The time-reversed version of that picture is that a particle &...
Sten's user avatar
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12 votes

Does the escape velocity formula take into account how a gravitationally bound object's distance to its primary increases before coming back down?

Yes, escape speed is an instantaneous calculation at the distance 'r' from the center of the object, as that changes you have to recalculate your escape speed. For example, these are the escape ...
Jason Goemaat's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

Joseph Weber's aluminum cylinder

The concept of the "resonant bar" detector for gravitational waves is that you get your cylinder of material to oscillate at its resonant frequency when pinged by a gravitational wave source....
ProfRob's user avatar
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6 votes

Calculating net gravitational force on Uranus

In the particular case of Uranus, (and considering Uranus and its moons a single system) You only need to consider the Sun + perturbations by the other outer planets. As a more general procedure, ...
James K's user avatar
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6 votes

What is the force responsible for the output of whiteholes?

I think it's worth keeping in mind that a lot of the exotic theoretical objects related to black holes are things that show up purely as solutions to the Einstein field equations. The field equations ...
Mark Foskey's user avatar
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4 votes
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Does a planets mass affect its gravitational pull? Let's say earth increased or decreased in mass could that theoretically affect gravity?

No, gravity is special, because it's pull is related to mass, but acceleration for a given force is inversely proportional to mass. Galileo noticed this: he observed that two masses, one small and ...
James K's user avatar
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3 votes

Does the escape velocity formula take into account how a gravitationally bound object's distance to its primary increases before coming back down?

The escape velocity is based on how much energy it takes to go "infinitely" far away from the object. That is, the escape velocity is a velocity such that for any $r$, the amount of work ...
Acccumulation's user avatar
2 votes

Does the escape velocity formula take into account how a gravitationally bound object's distance to its primary increases before coming back down?

Yes, it does. A good way of looking at this is to take not the difference in the object's velocity and the escape velocity at a given height, but at the difference between the object's velocity ...
Martin Kochanski's user avatar

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