21

It's red, because it's a 'sunburn'. The clouds in the red spot reach to higher altitudes than the surrounding and are more exposed to Solar UV radiation, which in turn changes the structure of some of the organic molecules etc. This is at least the explanation suggested by recent data from NASA's Cassini mission, see this 5 day old press release.


5

The Great red spot looks oval from above but is actually saucer shaped as the storm curves towards the center and the deepest point lies at the center. It is 16350 km wide, so the height is negligible compared to the width. The storm has its roots beneath the surface of the atmosphere. NASA’s Juno spacecraft calculated that the storm penetrate about 300 ...


3

The Great red spot used to be bigger. Over the course of twentieth century, it lost half of its size and between 1996 to 2006, its area diminished by 15%. If the shrink rate is constant, then the spot will vanish within 20 years. However, computer simulation showed that Jovian weather is stable enough to sustain smaller red spots as Hubble space telescope ...


1

You seem to know most of what there is to know about the Great Red Spot, except that there is not enough moisture in it for rain. It is cold enough for snow, but again there is a water deficiency. Water vapour is a comparatively rare gas in Jupiter's upper atmosphere. I think lightning would be admissible, and high winds too, and just possibly some frost. ...


1

Given that we have very few examples, we could not, statistically, draw any significance from any apparent bias. It's also hard to see any theoretical basis for expecting a bias, so my gut feeling would be there probably is no bias. It's also worth remembering that human observations of these things are essentially a very brief snapshot in a huge period ...


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