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A typical L-type brown dwarf is about 1200-2200 K in surface temperature and is about the size of Jupiter. Using the Stefan-Boltzmann law, we can deduce that the hottest brown dwarfs have a luminosity of$$\Big(\dfrac{2200}{5778}\Big)^4 \cdot \Big(\dfrac{1R_J}{1R_\odot}\Big)^2 = 0.00021224 L_\odot$$ According to Wikipedia, the dimmest apparent magnitude that ...


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Supernovas have a light curve going from normal to peak and back on the order of a month. Hence the spot would go from too cold to habitable and back very quickly. The same is true for stars passing the focal point: their motion (typically tens of km per second) makes the heated point move equally fast. Habitable zone denotes a region where a planet could ...


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Back of the envelope time. First, we have to assume perfect data, so the only factor at play here is whether there is a geometric eclipse or not. Of course if you have poorer data then you will miss some planets because they are too small. i.e. We are looking for the fraction that can be detected in principle. Let's assume the planets are small enough that ...


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I note that in old style space opera type stories, such as Star Trek, it is common to mention and visit habitable planets orbiting around types of stars which should not have habitable planets for various reasons. Thus one could assumed that in such stories hypothetical super advanced aliens have moved habitable planets into orbit around those stars, or ...


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TL;DR: Looking at the conditions of Triton and the current technology we have, it is almost impossible to terraform Triton. Long answer It is hypothesized that Triton could be used for colonization. Its surface shows signs of extensive geological activity that implies a subsurface ocean, perhaps composed of ammonia/water. BUT, BUT.... but don't get excited. ...


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