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1

(this is an incomplete answer: it doesn't provide a solution to the problem, but might result in a solution) Thanks to the USB vendor ID we were able to find the manufacturer, but unfortunately that didn't lead to any drivers. Browsing Meade's site from 2004/5 via Archive.org, I found an old downloads page and there's some software there which Archive.org ...


3

What was the definition of a planet before August 24, 2006? I think this deserves a bit more of an answer because it's not quite so simple. Yes, it's true that there was no formal definition of what a planet was prior to the 2006 vote, but essentially everyone knew what was and wasn't a planet, just as we know what is and isn't a star, though the boundary ...


3

The IAU website has this draft definition of "planet" and "plutons" page, published on 16 August 2006 in Prague. It says (emphasis mine): The world's astronomers, under the auspices of the International Astronomical Union (IAU), have concluded two years of work defining the difference between "planets" and the smaller "...


1

Based on the history of the Wikipedia article for planet preceding the IAU 2006 vote, there was no formal definition. So basically, a planet was just any body from this list of nine objects.


6

Short Answer: Kepler expressed his laws with the sun at a foci rather than a barycenter. Long Answer: In Astronomia Nova (pub. 1609) Kepler presents the first version of something we can recognize as Kepler’s first law: On page 285 of Astronomia Nova: CAPVT LIX. Demonftratio, quod orbita MARTIS, librati in diametro epicycli, fiat perfecta ellipfis: Et ...


3

From Wikipedia In his 1698 book, Cosmotheoros, Christiaan Huygens estimated the distance to Sirius at 27664 times the distance from the Earth to the Sun (about 0.437 light years, translating to a parallax of roughly 7.5 arcseconds). and It was also in this book that Huygens published his method for estimating stellar distances. He made a series of smaller ...


0

Henrietta Swan Levitt was the first person to develop the "standard candle" technique for measuring the distance to stars, while studying Cepheid variables around 1912-1913. Of course, the standard candle technique just extends the parallax technique to farther distances; in order to figure out how bright Cepheid variables are, Levitt had to know ...


2

As far as I know direct parallax measurements are the only way to directly measure the distances to stars. Once parallaxs of hundreds of stars were known and diagrams of the relationship between stellar luminosity and spectral types, such as the Hertzsrpung-Russel diagram, were made, it became possible to estimate a star's absolute magnitude more or less ...


5

The quotation is probably referring to The Great Comet of 1861. According to this Wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C/1861_J1 The comet may have interacted with the Earth in an almost unprecedented way. For two days, when the comet was at its closest, the Earth was actually within the comet's tail, and streams of cometary material converging ...


6

Earth passed through the tail of Halley's Comet in 1910. It caused a bit of a panic due to claims that cyanogen detected in the tail would cause harm: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halley%27s_Comet#1910 Linked there is https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1910/02/08/104920328.pdf (click for larger)


2

Gennady Borisov wrote on the astronomy.ru forum: The first observations of the object were made in the morning of August 30 with a 650 mm telescope, F / 1.5 Hamilton Первые наблюдения объекта были сделаны под утро 30 августа на телескопе 650 мм, F/1.5 Гамильтоне Yes, this is Hamilton. All surfaces are spheres. Has a 3-lens corrector. Good image quality, ...


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