30 votes

Is Jupiter still an anomaly?

A recent study indicates that Cold Jupiters similar to Saturn and Jupiter greatly outnumber Hot Jupiters. The authors studied 18 years worth of data to find long-period exoplanets, that is planets far ...
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7 votes

Can a dying, swelling, star be rejuvinated by enveloping orbiting gas giants?

Stars turn into Red Giants not because they're running out of fuel, but because they're accumulating material they can't use for fusion (yet) in the core. The star isn't so much dying of starvation as ...
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6 votes
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Plausible reason for the Hot Neptune gap

An explanation could be provided by irradiation and evaporation of planetary envelopes. The introduction in the article by Bourrier et al. 2018, which is the source of the NASA press release, ...
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4 votes
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Existence of planets larger than their host star?

The answer to the question depends on the exact definition of planet that is used. A possible example is the L dwarf 2M 0746+20 (2MASS J07464256+2000321) and its planet 2M 0746+20 b. The radius of ...
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4 votes
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If a hot Jupiter collides with the parent star, does it enhance or reduce the life of the star?

The short answer is pela's comment: more mass equals shorter life. For a bit of a longer explanation... The only way the life of the star could be prolonged is if the new material can be transported ...
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4 votes
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Are there any hot jupiters orbiting red dwarfs?

I found one "hot Jupiter" in the Kepler data (Kepler 45b). The star is a M dwarf with an effective temperature of 3820K. The planet has an estimated mass of 160.5 M(Earth) and radius of 10.76 R(Earth)....
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4 votes

Could evaporating hot Jupiters have metallic hydrogen on their surfaces?

Metallic hydrogen is an odd substance. When you push hydrogen atoms very close together, their electrons can come free, and move around, instead of being tightly bound to the atomic nuclei. As this ...
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4 votes
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How does a planet lose mass to its host star?

In the case of WASP-12b, at least, the close proximity to the star has actually deformed the planet so much that it is overflowing its Roche-lobe, the area around a planet or star that . We can show ...
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3 votes
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How many times can iron be detected for the first time in an exoplanetary atmosphere?

Neither of these, interestingly enough, is the first time iron has been detected in an exoplanetary atmosphere. Other groups (Hoeijmakers et al. 2018, cited by both papers) have detected absorption ...
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3 votes
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Hot and "warm" Jupiters expelling terrestrial planets?

It's not proof that they've ejected other inner planets, because there are plenty of other explanations for why we haven't observed companions. Steffen et al. (2012) analyzed Kepler data - likely some ...
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  • 33.7k
3 votes

Existence of planets larger than their host star?

Beyond red dwarfs, another possibility is that of a planet orbiting a type B subdwarf star. Some features of such stars: Composed almost entirely of helium Thought to be formed through the merger ...
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2 votes

Can hot Jupiters cause solar flares?

Sun is more than one thousand times the mass of Jupiter, so it seems unlikely that even a very close approach by a "hot Jupiter" to its host star would cause a flare, and especially not a superflare.
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2 votes
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Can hot Jupiters cause solar flares?

Just going off the Wikipedia article you posted, it says the hot jupiter superflare theory was abandoned. The flares were initially explained by postulating giant planets in very close orbits, ...
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2 votes
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Conditions on Hot Jupiters

I think we can broadly distinguish two classes of effects here: Flares directly affecting the planet The by-products of the flare affecting the planet I can loosely tell you what I know (although my ...
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2 votes

What proportion of planetary systems have been found with 'Hot Jupiters'

I completely agree with the answer from MBR. The number is actually $1.20\pm 0.38$ per cent, is published by Wright et al. (2012) and is the fraction of F, G, K stars that have a hot Jupiter defined ...
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  • 114k
1 vote

Retrograde orbits of exoplanets

The paper https://arxiv.org/abs/2101.09371 describes a hot-Neptune on a near polar retrograde orbit and discusses three posssible mechanisms to produce such an orbit: nodal precession, disk dispersal-...
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1 vote
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What is this gap between hot and cold Jupiters?

Giant planets like Jupiter form through accretion in the outer part of the disk, beyond the frost line where the material is cool enough for volatile icy compounds to remain solid. These planets ...
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1 vote
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Effect of Hot/Warm Jupiter atmosphere loss on other planets

The primary effects wouldn't be the things you ask about. First, an object the size of Jupiter would change the day and night sky drastically. The sky now is basically, Sun, Moon and a bunch of ...
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1 vote

What proportion of planetary systems have been found with 'Hot Jupiters'

Just for fun I did a limited analysis of Jupiter size planets found using radial velocity or astrometry (mostly the former) techniques with the following criteria: 1) Data from the on-line sources ...
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