5

I don't think so. In order to resolve an object one metre across (as a single pixel) at a distance of 384,400km (the diameter of the Moon's orbit), you would need a telescope mirror about 200 metres in diameter, and to achieve a resolution of 10cm (which you would probably need to form a recognisable image), you would need a telescope mirror with a 2km ...


3

They are mostly empirical. Found by measuring the $B-V$ for stars of known $T_{\rm eff}$ (which are in turn measured by knowing the luminosity and radius of a star, and this is only known for a small number of stars). The relationships also depend on stellar surface gravity and composition. An alternative approach is to derive "synthetic" relationships by ...


2

EDIT: I moved the last paragraph to the beginning because it's really a Python question, but I left my "manual" method answer in case it helps, too. Forgot to add this link to Python code on Github. It helped me get started with displaying images using Python and dealing with the headers without altering them. On line 19, I changed it to "...


2

A telescope with that resolution would be extremely expensive. Beyond any sort of reason today. Much of the technology we take for granted was impossible or very difficult when I was born. Back then not many ordinary people had telescopes anywhere the size that are common now. The 200" Palomar was the giant of it's time but today is dwarfed. There have ...


2

I think that somehow that string “M101” got inserted into the search box but has nothing to do with your query results. For example, if you click the “M101” link right below the box it will insert that into the search box without changing your search results until you click “Search”. The images shown in your search output are labeled with their object ...


1

Create a new PrimaryHDU with the image data and header and write that to disk. >>> hdul = fits.open(image) >>> phdu = fits.PrimaryHDU(hdul[1].data, hdul[1].header) >>> phdu.writeto('single.fits') >>> fits.info('single.fits') Filename: single.fits No. Name Ver Type Cards Dimensions Format 0 SCI ...


1

To answer the question: Yes, there is a way. Use a bright but unsaturated star. That might already be good enough, or you might want to do any number of corrections to this PSF model. A better way is to figure out the parameters to use with TinyTim, and generate an approximately right PSF from those. Most parameters you know, or they are easy to look up, ...


1

If the negative mass is not inside but outside the positive mass, wouldn't it push light passing by away from it, thus towards the positive mass, which would lead to a perceived higher gravitational lensing effect on the positive mass? If so, then https://www.spacetelescope.org/news/heic2016/ could maybe partially explained by negative mass halos on those ...


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