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2

I believe that is a typo. In Tables 4 and 5 of the same document, "UVIS 47" is listed as "g280", which is the grism you are curious about. A perusal of several other HST documents (e.g., various Wide Field Camera 3 Instrument Handbooks) turns up no mention of a "G200" element, and searches of the HST archive turn up nothing if &...


2

A reflection grating reflects its dispersed light away from the beam of the incoming light; a transmission grating or prism refracts it off at an angle to the incoming light as well. In both cases, you have to build the final part of the spectrograph (the imager with its sensor) at an angle to the optical axis of the instrument. This means that if you want ...


3

I'm pretty sure it's restricted to the near-IR, with the shortest wavelengths being $Y$-band or $J$-band (i.e., 1 or 1.2 microns) and the longest being $L$-band (i.e., 3.8 microns). This is probably because 1) classical adaptive optics systems use the optical for corrections that are applied in the near-IR (for reasons I discussed in this answer); and 2) ...


4

HST Proposal 15144, entitled "Deep Search for Satellites Around the Lucy Mission Targets", has a data page with 24 Hubble images of Polymele (you need to go to page 2 of 2 of the table). An example below: There is also a publication (Nole et al. 2020) associated with the proposal, but it focuses on Eurybates.


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Phil Plait's blog, Bad Astronomy, answers many of these questions. He reports that it was first spotted in WISE (Wide Field Infra-red Survey Explorer) data looking for Submillimeter bright galaxies, in the AllWISE data, it is just a blob. With follow-up observations by the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). You can read the journal article but it is ...


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