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Let's pretend we have a mirror in the shape of a spherical cap, with dimensions the same as JWST: diameter d=6.5m and radius of curvature r=15.88m. Then the distance along the surface of the mirror between two opposite points on its rim is given by 2r arcsin (d/2r), which comes to about 6.546m. This is only about 0.7% longer than the straight-line distance d....


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Sources above: https://www.facebook.com/NASAWebb/photos/10158883840795049/ below: https://jwst-docs.stsci.edu/jwst-observatory-hardware/jwst-telescope Do telescope measurements (in meters, usually) measure in a straight line, from edge to edge, or follow the curve of the mirror? The short answer is @JamesK's; it's the straight-line diameter of whatever ...


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Straight line, though it wont make much difference, The point about the size is that it tells you about how much light the telescope can gather. This is the "projected-flat" area, not the curved surface area. However, the difference is not much, as telescope mirrors are not highly curved. I suppose it makes more of a difference when considering ...


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The payload computer’s purpose is to control and coordinate the science instruments and monitor them for health and safety purposes. This news release provides some information about the problem and possible solutions: The computer halted on Sunday, June 13. An attempt to restart the computer failed on Monday, June 14. Initial indications pointed to a ...


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It seems that the planet is marked with longitudinal lines every 10 degrees, and so you can measure off the video that the planet rotates by about a little less than three longitudinal lines, or about 30 degrees. As Jupiter has a rotation period of just under 10 hours, the length of time can be estimated as about 10×30/360 hours: 50 minutes, or possibly ...


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