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There is basically an upper limit to the mass of a star because their luminosity is so great that the radiation pressure prevents the accretion of further mass. However, the upper limit depends on the composition of the accreting material. This is because the effect of the radiation depends on the opacity of the material - stuff that is more metal-rich is ...


2

I note that in old style space opera type stories, such as Star Trek, it is common to mention and visit habitable planets orbiting around types of stars which should not have habitable planets for various reasons. Thus one could assumed that in such stories hypothetical super advanced aliens have moved habitable planets into orbit around those stars, or ...


1

The Variable stars that Hubble studied in M31 when he showed that it was a galaxy are among the most luminous. They include Var-A1, a luminous blue variable, and magnitude about 16.5. Var A-1 is one of the most luminous stars known. Nasa has a catalog of stars in the m31 field, The brightest star in this catalog is an 11.4 magnitude star. But I think that ...


1

I found a text that suggests a Population III star can have a mass between 200 and 10^5$M_{Sun}$. There you can read: "...This would apply for VMOs larger than $M_c$ $\approx$ 200 $M_{Sun}$. Stars larger than 150$M_{Sun}$ are termed supermassive objects (SMOs)...". It seems supermassive stars like R136a1 (with masses in excess 150$M_{Sun}$, the accepted ...


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