34

As mentioned, these are the Pleiades, and the belt of Orion. These are visible in the South at this time of year. The Big and Little Dippers are in the North, so turn around. The best way to find them is a map: I've marked the approximate edge of your photo, with Orion, the V of the Hyades and the small cluster called the Pleiades. The big dipper is much ...


30

Stellarium shows the Moon and Mars very close together in the sky tonight (Saturday, 3rd October 2020), so yes, it was probably Mars that you saw. Moon and Mars on 2020/10/03 (Stellarium) Stellarium is a great tool for identifying astronomical objects (and satellites), and is absolutely free. Very rough rules of thumb for identifying planets by eye: Very ...


24

There were three attempts to measure Arrokoth by occultation, and the June 3rd attempt didn't detect anything. The July 10th attempt had a tiny blip, that appeared to be in the "wrong place", well away from the location that astrometry had predicted. The July 17th occultation was successful, it determined the shape and location well. Some thought ...


23

Fig. 1 and many others on that page seems to be diagrams of various trigonometric relations, used e.g. to convert between coordinates of celestial objects. But I'm not sure about this particular one. Fig. 21 is a armillary sphere, i.e. a physical model showing the position of objects in the sky. Because this particular model has Earth in its center, it's ...


22

Given the date and timing, this could be most like the Starlink satellites in their "stacked" configuration. They are currently in a line, but they will later move to separate orbits. Dr Marco Langbroek has a video of a line of 60 satellites. They won't stay in a line; they have ion engines that they will use to spread out into separate orbits.


15

If it was rather small, I suppose you were looking at the Pleiades, which is an open star cluster (not a constellation). Take a look at this web application: https://stellarium-web.org/ You can set a time and location and find constellations and other objects really easily.


15

Yes, those are the Pleiades. The form corresponds exactly to the photo below: (source: Star-Gazing - the disk below the Pleiades is Venus, this is a photo from April) As @theWrongAlice says, they're not a constellation, but they are part of Taurus (the Bull).


14

I'm pretty certain it is the 200inch Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory. There is an image galley of the 200 inch telescope. According to Richard Preston's book First Light: The Search For The Edge Of The Universe, Einstein attended the completion of the telescope truss, yoke and horseshoe bearing at Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company in ...


13

It's a star with pretty strong diffraction spikes. To find out which one it is, you can just look up its coordinates in databases like SIMBAD. Then you find that it is the star Xi Cygni. You can also find some information on it on Wikipedia.


13

The group of stars circled at the top of the photo is a star cluster named Pleiades. The Pleiades are in the constellation of Taurus. The group of stars circled at the bottom of the photo is part of the constellation of Orion. The three vertical stars on the left side of the circle are the belt stars of Orion. His upper body is to the upper left, and one leg ...


12

Question: How are these images obtained? Later in the video the narrator says they took the images using ESO's VLT. 03:40 [Narrator] 14.​ Making these measurements pushed the power of ESO’s Very Large Telescope to the limits. (Source: ESO transscript) Over the whole observation period multiple telescopes and imaging instruments were used. Early ...


12

According to Wikipedia: A preliminary analysis of all collected data suggested that Arrokoth was accompanied by an orbiting moonlet about 200–300 km (120–190 mi) away from the primary. It was later realized, however, that an error with the data processing software resulted in a shift in the apparent location of the target. After accounting for the bug, the ...


10

No. The purpose of sending a message is to have someone else read it. It defies logic to send a message over light years of space and then have it do anything but broadcast its presence very clearly to anyone who might possibly want to investigate it. If the goal of these UFOs was to tell us something, they wouldn't be such elusive specimens that only ...


9

I took the liberty of looking a bit closer at your image and annotate several features. If you look closely, you see that several of the brighter objects in your image do the exact same random walk. Those are e.e. the objects A, B and C. This already strongly hints to some shaking of the camera, rather than A being a UFO. If you look closer at your own ...


9

I contacted Dr. Danielle Adams, Deputy Director for Marketing and Communications at the Lowell Observatory. She was kind enough to reply, and generously provided the following (lightly edited for formatting): I spoke with one of our senior educators about the Clark knobs. The numbers below correspond to the numbers in the image posted in Why does this ...


9

OK, having (finally) actually looked at the video, it's clear that Szymanek is looking at the center of M33. There is in fact a nuclear star cluster in the center of that galaxy; not knowing the field of view or the resolution, I can't tell how much of the central condensation is simply the unresolved, smeared-out nuclear star cluster (which is small -- you ...


9

I was the one operating the telescope at the time! I was using our 11 inch telescope fitted with a 1 MP MallinCam camera. The image was taken at 9:21 pm with a 25 second exposure.


8

That second picture is not an elliptical orbit (at least, not as elliptical as depicted). It is a roughly circular orbit viewed from the side. Any orbit that appears as such (elliptical, but with the main body in the middle rather than at one of the two foci) is just a circular orbit viewed from just above or below the plane of the orbit.


8

Ptolemaic system Planets In Ptolemy's system, the two missing symbols are Venus (♀) and Mars (♂), respectively. The arc in the bottom of the Venus symbol actually belongs to Mercury below (☿). Stars The two following spheres contain the stars, which were believed to be eternally fixed. The two next are, I believe, also containing stars, namely the zodiac ...


8

In such situations, I find Astrometry.net particularly helpful. Feeding it your image, I got this result: Of course, the stars Pleione, Sterope, and Taygeta are enough to identify the Pleiades. While in this case it's fairly easy to identify the Pleiades by inspection alone and verify this, for less recognisable cases Astrometry.net is a very handy tool. ...


8

Having seen the extra photos, this is certainly a cloud. It is a high altitude cloud: a fragment of cirrus composed of ice crystals. These are aligned roughly horizontally, and they are catching the light of the moon. This is why the region of the cloud is more highly lit than the parts to the side: a sun-pillar (or moon-pillar?) effect. Its movement over ...


7

The event was in 1937; the telescope began operating in 1948. If this Getty photo is the same scene from a different angle, then those with Einstein in the lower frame are, from left to right, Nobel laureate physicist and Caltech president Robert Millikan, and Westinghouse engineers Guenther Froebel and Jesse Ormondroyd. In the upper frame, between Froebel (...


7

I saw a zig zag meteorite in Bukuru, Northern Nigeria, when I was about 13 in 1959. That started from small to increasing swings, then went out near the horizon. For many years I puzzled about this, but rarely mentioned it, because no one would believe it. Years later I attended an astronomy lecture at college in London. I cornered the astronomer with this ...


6

That looks like a lens effect. Polaris is the brightest object and there is an internal reflection in the lens or the camera. It's a nice photo under difficult conditions. Can you see NGC 188, an odd open cluster?


6

No. Such an orbit would be co-incidental and dynamically uninteresting. For a planet of given mass and rotation period, there is a class of orbits, whose period is equal to the rotation period of the planet. If the orbit is prograde this gives an interesting effect: the satellite would remain in the same position in the sky (or if it had an elliptical ...


6

Astrometry.net successfully plate-solved both images. The first image is of the Cygnus region with north to the left. It is 73° wide and 55° high, with 65 arcseconds per pixel or 55 pixels per degree. Bright stars include Deneb (α Cyg) left of center and Altair (α Aql) at upper right. The second image is of the Sagittarius region with ...


6

My interpretation would be that these are the planets Jupiter, Saturn and Mars. The bright star is Jupiter. It is rather lower than 20 degrees above the horizon, it is at about 10 degrees, but rising. The two other stars, one brighter than the other are Saturn (brighter) and Mars. Mars is really red, Saturn may be reddened by being low in the sky. Saturn ...


6

Her Wikipedia page also includes this picture (public domain), where she wears the same dress, and where a similar display can be seen in the background: Roman sits at the control console for the Orbiting Astronomical Observtory satellite, launched in 1972 and nicknamed Copernicus. This is a publicity picture; she never actually worked in the Goddard ...


6

Is this object Mars? I'm pretty sure this is simple lens flare. While lens surfaces in cameras have antireflection coatings that strongly reduce reflections, they are not perfect. A very bright small spot like the Sun or Moon or a bright streetlight will result in near-mirror images opposite the center of the image. Analysis from this answer: Here I used ...


5

There is probably no specific term, as I don't think such orbits occur naturally anywhere, nor there is any sense to launch an artificial satellite into such an orbit. But in general terms if an orbital period of a satellite is equal to the period of rotation of a body it orbits, such orbits are called synchronous (e.g. geosynchronous if the satellite ...


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