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5

I'm going to guess that these are reflection artifacts of one or two nearby bright stars. The fact that they have about the same length as the stellar streaks, suggests they are smeared by the telescope's tracking of the comet. The fact that they are oriented with a slightly different angle than the star streaks may be due to the reflection shifting slightly ...


0

I suspect they are brightish extended galaxies being smeared by the motion as HST tracks on the comet - you can see the star streaks e.g. in the bottom center of the image. Given the time of the image, it should be possible to identify which galaxies they were. Pretty much everything else in the image (apart from the comet) are cosmic rays - being above the ...


6

Astrometry.net successfully plate-solved both images. The first image is of the Cygnus region with north to the left. It is 73° wide and 55° high, with 65 arcseconds per pixel or 55 pixels per degree. Bright stars include Deneb (α Cyg) left of center and Altair (α Aql) at upper right. The second image is of the Sagittarius region with ...


9

OK, having (finally) actually looked at the video, it's clear that Szymanek is looking at the center of M33. There is in fact a nuclear star cluster in the center of that galaxy; not knowing the field of view or the resolution, I can't tell how much of the central condensation is simply the unresolved, smeared-out nuclear star cluster (which is small -- you ...


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