8

I agree that it’s noise in a fixed pattern, but I think it’s unlikely to be related to ADC sensitivity. Typically if you have multiple ADCs, they read out blocks of the sensor (e.g. one on each corner to read out a quadrant). And sensitivity differences across those amplifiers usually is removed pretty well by flat-fielding. In my experience, you get things ...


6

That looks like a fixed-pattern noise to me. Fixed pattern noise is a common sensor artefact for CCD sensors, One source for this is where you have less analog - digital converters (ADC) than pixels. Say, you have N ADC, each with its own sensitivity. Then you have in the resulting image a sensitivity pattern which repeats every N pixels. Depending on ...


6

The current largest digital CCD camera is that of the Vera C. Rubin Observatory1 which has a whopping 3.2 gigapixels. The previous largest features on the Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), and has a resolution of ~1.4 gigapixels.[1] Based on the spec sheet provided by the Vera Rubin Observatory, the LSST camera has a ...


5

The pixel size is not a major constraint on the imaging capabilities of an astronomical telescope. The angular resolution of the image is limited by diffraction at the aperture of the telescope. For a reasonable pixel size, the telescope geometry can then be designed so that each pixel corresponds to a region of sky smaller than that angular resolution, so ...


4

Those are probably just "hot pixels" that don't move on the sensor like the real stars do, so that the stacking spread them out in an arc. I don't think the software processes and treats each star separately, they can't be "skipped stars" mingled with "recognized stars". Notice that they are all 1 pixel wide, whereas stars are ...


4

Is it possible to use Photolithography for telescope image sensor? Sure, in the sense that CCDs and similar devices are already made using photolithography, and have been for decades. But since you then go on to ask: Will it be possible to use a chemical image sensor to achieve a nanometer pixel size? it seems that your focus is on the idea that increasing ...


3

This is usually referred to in astronomy as the "drift scan" technique, and has actually been used with ground-based telescopes since the early 1980s (e.g., McGraw, Angel, & Sargent 1980, Wright & Mackay 1981). Gibson & Hickson (1992) have a summary of work done in the 1980s and early 1990s in the Introduction section of their paper; ...


2

Dark Energy Survey data have yielded several TNO discoveries. Bernardinelli et al. 2020 describe their method in detail. First they compute a trial orbit from images where a transient object was detected. Then Final validation of the reality of linked orbits uses a new "sub-threshold confirmation" test, wherein we demand the object be detectable ...


2

The online version of the digitised sky survey will give you as many images of the sky as you want. Be aware that these are based on photographic plates. Also be aware that every imaging system has its own peculiarities in terms of the shape of the point spread function (i.e. the shape of a star in the image) and features such as diffraction spikes. https://...


1

If actual photographs are not required, Stellarium could render a suitable set of reference images. Use the Perspective (gnomonic) projection for the closest match to a photograph, and display only the features you want. Its scripting capability may help you avoid repeating some manual operations. Here are a sample pair of Stellarium images. The first has ...


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