New answers tagged

1

Simbad is giving a catalogue of astronomical objects (that are identified in the Simbad catalogue) referred to in the AAS article. This is routinely done for most papers in the recognised astronomical literature. In this case, Betelgeuse appears to be the only star specifically mentioned in that AAS paper (actually just the abstract that is seen on the ADS ...


3

The SIMBAD link might be there just because Osterbrock's 2004 AAS presentation about the interferometer mentioned an observation of Betelgeuse. This would be consistent with the policy stated in Wenger et al. 2000: No assessment is made of the relevance of the citation in terms of astronomical contents: the paper can be entirely devoted to the ...


3

The Great red spot used to be bigger. Over the course of twentieth century, it lost half of its size and between 1996 to 2006, its area diminished by 15%. If the shrink rate is constant, then the spot will vanish within 20 years. However, computer simulation showed that Jovian weather is stable enough to sustain smaller red spots as Hubble space telescope ...


0

It is not only shrinking but also becoming taller at the same time. The Great Red Spot's color has been deepening, too, becoming intensely orange since 2014. Researchers aren't sure why that's happening, but it's possible that the chemicals which color the storm are being carried higher into the atmosphere as the spot stretches up.


6

The Jupiter Trojans are not at the Sun-Jupiter L4 and L5 Lagrange points. They are instead in pseudo orbits about those points. These pseudo orbits appear from the perspective of a frame of reference that rotates at Jupiter's orbital rate (i.e., a frame in which the Sun and Jupiter are more or less fixed). Unlike central body motion, which results in planar ...


0

Surely there are some years when we are aligned with Jupiter so much so that it would exert some sort of perceptible influence on the planet, thus lengthening the year, even if only by some hours or days, considering that the sun is much more massive. Let's do the math. The force of gravity is $F = \frac{Gm_1m_2}{r^2}$. When in alignment, the Earth and ...


0

Hubble observations in 1994 revealed that Great Dark Spot on Neptune observed by Voyager 2 had disappeared. In 1998, further observations revealed the formation of a similar dark spot in the planet's northern hemisphere, so at least in the case of Neptune and Saturn (see adrianmcmenamin's answer), both hemispheres are capable of forming such systems.


2

I find a zoom eyepiece and Barlow to be useful for viewing planets. Depending on your location, seeing can be very variable, sometimes changing from one second to the next. A zoom eyepiece lets you adjust the magnification without switching eyepieces, so you can quickly adapt to the changing seeing conditions. The downside of zooms is that they tend to have ...


2

From my limited experience, being able to see the rings on Saturn is more or less the extent of how powerful eyepieces can get for a home telescope. To get better and larger images would require a better and probably larger telescope.


Top 50 recent answers are included