8

No they didn't. The deduction that (very) heavy elements are being produced is somewhat indirect and involves creating a theoretical model of the expanding "fireball" and comparing that model against measurements of brightness vs time at a range of wavelengths and against spectra (mostly in the infrared) as the afterglow faded. Normally, when we view a ...


6

I think it is generally expected that the merger of two neutron stars will lead to the formation of a black hole. What is more uncertain is whether that black hole forms straight away, or an intermediate state of a hyper(/supra)massive neutron star forms (see, e.g. Sec IIC of Hotokezaka et al, PRD, 044026, 2013 for a definition of hypermassive and ...


4

Any of these phenomena would be visible to the naked eye if they occured in the Milky Way, or a neighbouring galaxy (such as the Magellanic clouds) and was not obscured by dust. At the distance of stars, all of these would appear star-like. Supernovae have been seen, most recently in 1987, when there was a supernova in the Large Magellanic cloud. It had a ...


3

This is a kind of silly question because you are dealing with object (stars, etc) that cannot exist in an atmosphere so treat the whole below as a bit of a lark. The decibel scale is logarithmic. 120 dB is one joule of sound energy. 130 Joules is ten times more: 10 Joules, 140 is 100 Joules etc. (Source) The loudest sound on Earth is said to be Krakatoa at ...


2

When two neutron stars collide, the resulting supernova is called a "kilonova," producing much more energy than a regular supernova. Additionally, heavier elements are formed, such as gold, platinum, etc. Other effects of this collision include a gamma-ray burst and/or gravitational waves. The object formed after the event can either be a heavier ...


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