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There were three attempts to measure Arrokoth by occultation, and the June 3rd attempt didn't detect anything. The July 10th attempt had a tiny blip, that appeared to be in the "wrong place", well away from the location that astrometry had predicted. The July 17th occultation was successful, it determined the shape and location well. Some thought ...


12

According to Wikipedia: A preliminary analysis of all collected data suggested that Arrokoth was accompanied by an orbiting moonlet about 200–300 km (120–190 mi) away from the primary. It was later realized, however, that an error with the data processing software resulted in a shift in the apparent location of the target. After accounting for the bug, the ...


4

"Moons" is a misnomer here, the majority of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) with companions are binaries. Now there are several populations in the Kuiper Belt, characterized by their eccentricities and inclinations. The cold classicals are hereby the most important ones, having mostly circular, low inclination orbits and a high binarity fraction of ...


2

How come the comets and asteroids in the Kuiper belt and Oort cloud are kept in a gravitational field and they don't get pushed and pulled by the planets around them? Basically, they're so far away from the planets that those don't exert significant influence on them. The Sun is much heavier, so those objects remain where they are and don't escape into ...


2

It depends on what you call large. There may be hundreds of thousands of icy bodies larger than 100 km (62 miles) and an estimated trillion or more comets within the Kuiper Belt. But the total mass of objects in the Kuiper belt is estimated to be less than 10% of earth's mass. So the Kuiper belt is largly composed of small icy onjects. These objects are ...


2

Tl;Dr: It is a matter of consideration if you want to call Kuiper belt bodies/Oort cloud bodies "asteroids" or not. Long answer: The Oort cloud defines the cosmographic boundary of the Solar System and the extent of the Sun's Hill sphere and hence it is loosely bound to the Solar System, and thus is easily affected by the gravitational pull both of ...


1

I consider the edge of any solar system the distance beyond which the central star(s) don't provide for enough light to create a reasonable "day" on the star-facing side. In other words, if you're on a celestial body that has night on all sides (e.g. on an Oort cloud object), you may no longer consider being in that solar system, you're just on a ...


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