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9 votes

Expected nature of LISA's data; will it be more like a forest of static peaks, or a series of individual events?

LISA's data will be very different from LIGO's. It will typically "see" many sources at the same time. Most prominently: Mergers of pairs of supermassive blackholes. These will be very much like a ...
TimRias's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Which things can LIGO see that LISA can't, and vice-versa?

Gravitational wave detectors have a frequency range that they are sensitive to. In the case of LIGO it is about 10Hz to 1kHz. The lower limit is imposed by seismic noise, the upper limit by "shot ...
ProfRob's user avatar
  • 155k
5 votes

Can't pulsars and stars be used for gravitational wave measurement?

How LIGO, LISA, etc. Detect Gravitational Waves The point of instruments like LIGO and LISA is to measure time-varying changes in the distance within different arms of the instrument. In the case of ...
Peter Erwin's user avatar
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3 votes
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Giant variation of the proposed eLISA mission using reflectors on Earth and the Moon possible?

This would not be a giant version of eLISA, but a small (and complicated) one. The distance between the LISA satellites will be 1 million kilometers, while the moon is on average 380.000km from ...
Alex's user avatar
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2 votes
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Expected nature of LISA's data; will it be more like a forest of static peaks, or a series of individual events?

A discussion of the analysis of LISA data is given by Boileau et al. (2021). Specifically, they provide an in depth analysis of exactly the point you are interested in - to what extent is LISA able to ...
ProfRob's user avatar
  • 155k
1 vote

Expected nature of LISA's data; will it be more like a forest of static peaks, or a series of individual events?

Our galaxy hosts probably more than $10^6$ binary stars with periods ranging from one day to about 100 days. Each is thought to have at least six planets orbiting it. Each planet has a different ...
9herbert9's user avatar
  • 101
1 vote

Can't pulsars and stars be used for gravitational wave measurement?

Can't pulsars and stars be used for gravitational wave measurement? In theory, yes. See the 2017 NASA article Listening for Gravitational Waves Using Pulsars. Suppose that we collected photons ...
John Duffield's user avatar

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