New answers tagged

1

It is always difficult to say who is "the first" at something, as there are often cases where you can really dig and find something earlier. I started searching based on my answer to your similar question, but Hartmann (1973) did not use the word "dichotomy" in his paper. I did a search through all of the journal articles on my computer ...


1

There is almost no data available on the internet as such. Though, the theory that they (Mercury and Venus) are stabilised by the Sun's Tidal Force seems very likely as they are much closer to the sun than any other planet. The Sun very easily dwarfs these planets in both size and gravitational and tidal attraction. I found this Wikipedia page that I think ...


9

In "The Planet of Doubt", Stanley G. Weinbaum, Astounding Stories, October 1935, there is a scene where Hamilton Hammond, leader of a expedition to the north pole of Uranus, explains his descision to set a southeastern course while searching for land: "I'll tell you. Did you ever look at a globe of the Earth, Pat? Then maybe you've noticed ...


14

It looks like the Mariner 9 era. Based on a review paper by Watters et al. ("Hemispheres Apart: The Crustal Dichotomy on Mars"): "The north-south asymmetry ... was clear from the first global image mosaics of Mars returned in the 1970s by Mariner 9 (Mutch et al., 1976) and the Viking Orbiters." Other papers cite a 1973 paper by Hartmann ...


3

Quantities in the fact sheets are explained here. The surface acceleration is slightly lower than the surface gravity because the former also includes the effects of rotation, which slightly offsets the gravitational force.


3

The technical content of NASA's web pages have sadly declined over the years. The planet fact sheets are exemplary of that decline. The December 8, 2002 version of that page provides only one value instead of two, titled "surface gravity". The values are 3.69 m/s2 for Mars and 9.78 m/s2 for Earth. The gravitational acceleration at the surface of ...


1

If you have access, I would recommend you to read Carter et al. (2013). It is a compilation of all occurrences of hydrous minerals that have been detected on Mars by spectrometers OMEGA (Mars Express/ESA) and CRISM (Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter/NASA). This data was used to investigate the spatial distribution, composition, and age of hydrous minerals on Mars. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included