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It is the other way around. An isolated, point-like charged particle like an electron cannot absorb a photon. It is forbidden, because energy and momentum cannot be simultaneously conserved. Only scattering is permitted in such circumstances. However, a charged particle that is within the electric field of another (e.g. an electron in the electric field of a ...


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As @Codosaur mentioned earlier, it is the electrons that absorb the the energy of the photon and not the Nucleus. Let's take a theoretical example to see how this works. Imagine an atom without any disturbances. It's electrons are in a relaxed state. That is, the electrons are stable in their orbits. Now, a photon's energy is absorbed by the atom. This can ...


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It's the electrons of an atom that absorb the energy of the photon, not the nucleus. The frequency of the incoming light wave is at or near the energy levels of the electrons in the matter. The electrons will absorb the energy of the light wave and change their energy state. Atoms are perpetually vibrating at any temperature above zero Kelvin. Some of those ...


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