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And we know that many of astronomers know that mercury orbit does not precess ... Mercury's orbit does precess, by a good amount. The greatest amount is explained by Newtonian mechanics. Venus, Jupiter, and to a lesser extent, all the other planets, make Mercury's orbit precess by over 500 arcseconds per century. A key problem of the latter half of the 19th ...


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Mercury's orbit is highly eccentric: 0.21 according to Wikipedia. Therefore, the actual time between repeating occurrences will vary depending on the year. If you were to perform your calculations for many periods, the average should approach the value given by Stellarium. The theoretical synodic period, using the sidereal period of Earth and Mercury, is ...


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usrLTK's answer provides a lot of good details and in particular explains why Mercury wouldn't have much of an atmosphere. Let me complicate the picture a little by pointed out that some recent research indicates that magnetic fields may not be the guaranteed, automatic atmosphere-protection devices that conventional wisdom suggests. In particular, Gunell ...


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Addressing @Allure's comment below @ JohnHoltz's excellent answer, the synodic period is simply a function of the two periods. It will return something like the average value between two successive events where the planets would line up if they orbited in the same plane, but it does not predict the exact times as pointed out in that answer. In addition to ...


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If I'm reading your question correctly, your suggestion is that Mercury, having a small magnetic field, should have some atmosphere, perhaps more atmosphere than Mars, with no magnetic field, though Mars does have some surface generated magnetic field regions, it just lacks a field generated by its core. Solar stripping due to no magnetic field isn't the ...


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Thanks to the Mercury transit, you can measure the parallax from the Earth. That happens due to TRACE , which tracks the transit of Mercury along the polar diameter of the Earth. During that tracking, the transit of Mercury goes like that: [ Now notice that, if TRACE remained stationary, the transit would be a straight line. So, if you calculate the ...


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