29

The comet sheds material each time it get close to the sun. The sun heats this dirty snow ball, the ice evaporates and tears dust and smaller rocks with it. These dust particles then follow a similar orbit around the sun as the comet. But as they are ejected with some velocity and react differently to the solar wind & radiation, their orbit is slightly ...


13

A very interesting question. Neither Bruce McClure at EarthSky nor I knew the answer, despite the fact that the observed gradual rise in numbers for the Perseids - and their quick drop-off - is something we've both observed for decades. So we asked a true expert on meteor showers, Robert Lunsford of the American Meteor Society. He also said: "Good question!" ...


10

Three millions. For this answer to be any fun, let's first assume that before removing the atmosphere, we have equipped all humans with oxygen supplies. In return, they are not allowed to go indoors or otherwise protect themselves. The size of meteors — as well as most other things in the Universe — has a distribution that is well described by a power-law. ...


10

The comet releases lots of dust particles. The sunlight pushes these particles into orbits not quite the same as the comet Some particles will be pushed into faster orbits, some will be pushed into slower orbits. Over time the dust particles get spread out in a band that goes all the way around the sun. So we don't just see meteors in the years that the ...


8

Interesting question indeed, especially since it's still a matter of investigation in meteor research area! Here are some elements of answer (but definitely not all elements...): This observed asymetry is especially true for the Geminids, and less for the Perseids. Best is to check the activity profile, available e.g. at imo.net: https://www.imo.net/...


6

To put it in simple terms, a comet's debris trail or dust trail is like a ring of debris that generally follows the entire orbit of the comet, more concentrated close to the comet, more spread out further away, but it can be thought of, for simplicity, as an entire ring of debris, kind of, a miniature asteroid belt with a fixed elliptical path. The picture ...


6

The cometary particles need not retain the exact same orbit as the comet in order to stay close together near perihelion, thus where their orbit passes Earth's orbit. Slight changes in the orbital parameters of the released dust particles can include slighly higher or lower aphelion, and thus change the revolution time and the time of perihelion (Earth) ...


6

Meteor showers tend to be formed from dust from short period comets. As they swing repeatedly around the sun, they build up a stream of dust in orbits close to their own orbit. Some will be pushed slightly off the comet's orbit and end up orbiting faster or slower than the comet, and eventually the stream of dust will go all around the sun. The other thing ...


5

There is a class of meteorites called Lunar Meteorites and several of those have been found on earth. Of course, it doesn't necessarily indicate whether we have actually witnessed a certain lunar meteor shower. Considering that nearly 100 metric tons of space debris falls on earth each day, one would imagine that it'll be colossally impractical to attempt ...


3

You can see perseid meteors from all the Northern Hemisphere, and the Northern part of the Southern Hemisphere. Provided the sky is clear, the moon has set, and Perseus is above the horizon you will see meteors. This shower has a wide peak, so you can see them over several nights.


3

To answer the second part of the question: Will you be able to see the Perseids in the daytime with the naked eye this year? No. Regular meteor showers (those caused by the Earth passing through the orbit of a comet) have meteors that ... are caused by particles ranging in size from about that of a small pebble down to a grain of sand, and generally ...


3

There is variation in meteor showers from year to year, but for most showers, the big difference is how bright the moon is. If the moon is up, then it's hard to see many meteors. The Perseids of 2017 will be rather ruined by the moon. There will be a waning gibbous moon, rising shortly after sunset and staying up for the rest of the night. It will make the ...


3

In historical times we do not have enough data to do serious statistics about meteors of the size of the Chelyabinsk meteor. In Wikipedia's list of meteor air bursts there are only six events within two orders of magnitude of the Chelyabinsk meteor. $$\begin{array}{lll} \hline \text{Date} & \text{Location} & \text{Energy [TJ]}\\ \hline \text{1490-...


3

Not that I know of, and it would somewhat surprise me. The number of meteors from a shower you will see depends on the time of night through a number of reasons (not considering the weather and the moon): The distribution of meteoroids on Earth's orbit is not homogeneous. The highest potential occurs when Earth moves through the peak of the distribution. ...


3

The number you are able to detect increases as it gets darker. The number occurring is apt to be greater when the zenith of the sky is closest to pointing in the direction the earth takes orbiting the sun (like a windshield hitting more bugs than back window when a car is moving forward) The last factor I can think of at the moment is the density of ...


2

Meteorites are rocks, and rocks are normally quite insoluble. When an insoluble body is mixed with water the pH of the water isn't changed.# Meteorites contain quite a lot of various metallic oxides, which are bases. This includes magnesium oxide which can dissolve a little, and is Alkali. The energy released by a large impact could also cause some nitrogen ...


2

The Draconids have a radiant that, from the the Northerly Latitudes (N America or Europe) is highest in the sky in the early evening of October 7th or 8th. This means that unlike most showers (which are best before dawn) the Draconids are most active after dusk. They are not visible to many Southern Hemisphere observers. They are capable of producing short-...


2

Leo starts to rise at about midnight, local time, so you should be fine, weather permitting. Note also that you may be able to see meteors even before then, as Leo is merely that part of the sky from which the meteors appear to originate, but you will likely be able to see them some distance away from Leo. I don't know where the Google rise time comes from....


2

The Perseids will not be the brightest in recorded human history. The fact-checking website snopes.com has this to say about this false claim: The reason the web site that originally made this claim cites zero sources is likely due to the fact that there is a complete lack of factual information to support it. The 2017 Perseid shower won't even be as "...


2

The International Meteor Organization calendar for 2016, page 12, gives the Perseid radiant declination as +58$^\circ$ and says "regrettably, it cannot be properly viewed from most of the southern hemisphere." At latitude -34$^\circ$ the radiant never rises above the horizon, so there may be fewer Perseid meteors than sporadic non-Perseids. This does not ...


2

There is a discussion of this at http://cosmoquest.org/forum/archive/index.php/t-107733.html In summary, the perseids occur on the same date of the sidereal year, which differs from the tropical year due to precession. This causes a change of about one day in 70 years to the date of a meteor shower. 2600 years causes a change of about 37 days compared to ...


2

Okay, this turned out to be quite a long answer describing a few arguments I've com up with. The short answer is: maybe, maybe not, but I think it's possible. There are arguments to be made for either side of this discussion, and I don't think you you can ever be absolutely sure unless you find an expert on both astronomy and Chinese folk tales (which I don'...


2

Realistically, no, that cannot happen. Most meteor showers that we experience on Earth - the most famous being the Perseids and the Leonids - are a result of comets passing roughly through our orbit and leaving behind debris that was burned off as the comet passed by the Sun. We then come along, sweeping through this debris and from our perspective on Earth, ...


2

Meteor showers are associated with dust trails left by comets, There are larger clumps, but most cometary dust is pretty small. Most large impactors are small asteroids: This was certainly the case in Chelyabinsk, and is the likely the case with Tunguska. Asteroids are not associated with cometary orbits and the impacts are sporadic, not concentrated in ...


2

The darker the better. There are meteors of different brightnesses in the Perseid shower, including some fireballs that can be seen in any (cloudless) sky. But many of the meteors are dimmer, and the quoted rate of 60 per hour assumes dark skies. As there is no moon tonight, you would benefit if you can get to a dark sky location. If you can see the ...


2

Wikipedia does not cite a source. NASA used to make predictions, eg.: 2009 LEONID OUTBURST FORECAST A significant shower is expected this year when Earth crosses the 1466-dust and 1533-dust ejecta of comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. According to J. Vaubaillon, the narrow (about 1-hr) shower is expected to peak on November 17, 2009, at 21:43 (1466) and 21:50 (...


2

It sounds like this effect: ... in addition to the usual shower on August 12th, there might be an extra surge of meteors on August 11th caused by a filament of dust newly drifting across Earth's orbit. The filament, like all the rest of the dust in the Perseid cloud, comes from Comet Swift-Tuttle. The difference is, the filament is relatively young. It ...


2

There are more or less two possibility to get debris in a sufficient amount: collisions and breakup/ejection. Collisions This is mostly the case for asteroids. At the point of impact you get a cloud of debris which basically moves as if the colliding bodies combined into a bigger one. However, for small objects, the fragments in the cloud are not ...


2

Meteoroids belonging to the same stream (so, this is valid not only for the Perseids stream) actually do follow the same trajectory (orbit) in space but meteors caused by them apparently appear to originate from a particular spot in the sky (the so called radiant) trailing in all possible directions away from it only due to our perspective of view. In fact, ...


2

They are all following parallel paths. They are not on exactly the same trajectory but they are all travelling parallel to each to other in their orbit around the sun, in a stream of particles. What you see is then multiple meteors on parallel paths. When you look in the direction that the meteors are coming from you see them appearing to radiate from a ...


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