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1

The factor k, the fraction of sky you cannot see, is not adjusted because of the ground or your peripheral vision. When on a flat plain (a "sea-level" horizon) and none of the sky is covered by clouds, buildings, or trees, then k=0. (Therefore, F=1, and the Zenithal Hourly Rate is not diminished.) I do not know how the light pollution map was created and ...


2

You are mostly correct: a dark site is desirable, and the altitude of the radiant affects the observed hourly rate. However, meteors can appear in any part of the sky; you need not face the radiant exactly. The American Meteor Society recommends: The best strategy to see the most activity is to face the northeast quadrant of the sky and center your view ...


2

Quick answer because the shower is tonight. For any given meteor shower in a given year (e.g. Quadrantids, now) where can I see a rough prediction of how many days it will last? The PDF linked on the page linked in the answer there says the shower is unusually short (FWHM of 4 hours) and the maximum is at 08:00 UTC which is 4 PM where I am and must be ...


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The International Meteor Organization publishes an annual Meteor Shower Calendar. The PDF document for 2020 predicts a Quadrantid peak on January 4, 08:20 UT, and says: The peak is short-lived with an average duration (full width at half-maximum, FWHM – that is the period with ZHR above half of the peak level) of about four hours. Unfortunately it only ...


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