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40

If you see the same meteor, it of course only has one path - even while the apparent movement differs for different observers. What you basically do in that case is triangulation - which you could use with your known geographic location (and time for the observations, and the direction horizontally and vertically) reconstruct the flight path. That's a method ...


18

Yes, but it depends on your reference system. If the meteor was moving East to West over England, it would appear to be going Left to Right from Norway, but Right to Left from Spain.


13

Yes, if the object is moving between the two of you then your reference systems are different. For example two people standing on opposite sides of a river. One sees it flowing from left to right, the other sees it flowing from right to left. The river, or meteor, has not itself changed direction, but you'll each describe the direction differently if you're ...


5

tl;dr, Like Aaron F mentioned in the comments, this is likely a drone. Let’s consider why it probably isn’t anything else. The nearest star to us, Proxima Centauri, is located 1.3 parsecs away from us. To move in such a fashion for an object that far away would require movements faster than the speed of light, which of course is not possible, and thus it ...


4

I think that it was most likely the satellite "LEO Vantage 1". From https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/leo-vantage-1.htm : Telesat ordered in April 2016 two prototype Ka-band HTS (High Throughput Satellite) communication satellites, yet unnamed, as part of a test and validation phase for an advanced, global LEO satellite constellation that ...


3

According to NASA Meteor Watch Facebook page, they: obtained infrasound measurements from 3 nearby stations - the amplitudes and durations of the signals put the energy of the fireball fragmentation at 440 pounds (200 kilograms) of TNT. Here is an image of the infrasound: From this news story, A man in Canton, Maine said there was a delay of several ...


3

No, they do not change direction when they pass over country borders or latitude. It is just based on where your positions are relative to the meteor.


2

How can I go about finding out whether others saw it as well, and what it was? I can't say for the "what was it?" part, but there is actually a way to answer the first part of your question. There is a citizen science project called Vigie-Ciel (part of the much larger Fripon project), where anyone who has witnessed a fireball can contribute with ...


2

How come the comets and asteroids in the Kuiper belt and Oort cloud are kept in a gravitational field and they don't get pushed and pulled by the planets around them? Basically, they're so far away from the planets that those don't exert significant influence on them. The Sun is much heavier, so those objects remain where they are and don't escape into ...


2

Meteors caused by small objects are visible. Most visible [meteors are produced by meteoroids, which] are between 1 mm and 1 cm in diameter. For example, a meteor of magnitude +5, which is barely visible with the naked eye in a dark sky, is caused by a meteoroid of 0.5 mm in diameter and weighs only 0.00006 grams. Meteors are atmospheric phenomena and only ...


2

The naming must first be defined. Meteoroid: A rock orbiting the Sun. Meteor: When a meteoroid enters a planet's atmosphere it becomes a meteor. This is what we see streaking across the sky, mostly at night, and are indeed very small. Related, there could also be a 'fireball' This would be a larger rocks . Meteorite: If the rock survives the passage through ...


1

Given the time of observation and the fact that the object was "still" than appeared to change direction and finally faded I would say that it was an airplane reflecting the rising sun. This is a common observation about sunrise and sunset. (Like ISS passes. The same principle at work). edit What seemed the answer, or at least a very reasonable one,...


1

I had a similar sighting about 50 years ago. Staring idly into the sky at night, a star near my center of vision suddenly blew a small smoke-ring and disappeared in the middle of it. I was startled. Never have figured that out. Afterwards, I had no way to reference that event to others. So I admire the skymap presented with this question. Finding other ...


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