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I'm a researcher at Curtin University working on the Desert Fireball Network. The DFN is the largest fireball observation network in the world, and our primary goal is to recover meteorites with orbital information attached. The traditional rule of thumb for meteorite-dropping events is a final luminous height below 35 km and a final luminous velocity below ...


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Well if no one is going to answer this I will. The answer is we don't know for sure. We speculate that there should be earth rocks on mars but until we 'see' one and analyze it we will not know for sure. The comments here all point to this answer. Mars hit with thousands of Earth rocks possibly containing life following asteroid impacte talks about the ...


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Nice question, unfortunately your analoguous experiment is not as analoguous as you might hope. In your comparison image you are using both, not enough impactors, and a too tiny size distribution. Impactors on the Moon (or any other objects) follow a reasonably well-known size distribution where the smaller an impactor is, the more frequent collisions with ...


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Scientists think they have - the Mojave crater. Also see https://science.sciencemag.org/content/343/6177/1343


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It is certainly possible for rocks from Earth to be ejected and impact - and survive impact - on Mars. However, without doing specific isotopic analysis to determine the origin, one cannot simply look at a meteorite and determine its source body. No rovers that we have now have the capability to measure these isotopes. With that overview, it is much ...


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First, Terminology: Age is how old something is. Relative age is how old something is when compared to another (older vs younger). Absolute age is putting a number on that age (I am XX years old). Absolute model age is an absolute age that is based on a model, but where the age has not been measured directly (based on this cat's tooth, its absolute model ...


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Does not sound astronomical. But in order to test for astronomical phenomenon you need to state date time (time zone) and location, and direction (roughly). Of course if it was cloudy. The free software Stellarium (stars planets, satellites + ...), in conjunction with Heavens Above (up to date satellite info) can answer most of these types of questions.


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Was there ever a meteorite with measurable gravity? At risk of stating the obvious: Yes. All mass, as far as every test I know about, has measured gravity. No test has ever measured no gravity within the range of accuracy, so even low mass objects can have their gravity measured. Rubble pile asteroids couldn't form if they didn't exert gravity. ...


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Meteors don't move slowly. Large fireballs do occur, rarely, but they move pretty fast, a few seconds at most. Meteors that are bright enough to be seen in daylight are even rarer. When a meteor is falling you can't see the "rock". Even a large meteoroid is only a few metres across, and they are 50-100km up in the atmosphere, and surrounded by glowing ...


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This is only a partial answer; meteor falls are pretty common and so their density will be high in flat areas without a lot of flowing water, they're hard to identify without a good eye or at least a sensitive metal detector. Hopefully a more quantitative source for the areal density of meteor finds can be found. The numbers are there, and if all rocks in ...


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Only two meteorites have been found on Earth that are composed of andesite. They were found at the Graves Nunataks ice shield in Antarctica during a US Antarctic search for meteorites in 2006/07. The meteorites are labelled GRA 06128 and GRA 06129. Geologically, the samples are unusual because they are rare samples of felsic crustal material and they are ...


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The short answer to your question is, "no," and that's for a couple reasons. There are a lot of different styles of volcanism, but they can be broadly classified as "pyroclastic" and "effusive." Pyroclastic is your classic volcanic eruption that looks like an explosion out the top. Effusive is more like a pot on the stove that ...


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For an absolute calibration you need a sample of the rock you are trying to date, and put it into a mass spectrometer for isotopic analysis. This is done via the lunar cratering record (images) and corresponding samples collected by the Apollo missions. A recent re-analysis can be found here.


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None in historical times. A tsunami is caused by a displacement of water, so for a meteorite to cause a measurable tsunami it would have to be very large. The largest known impactor in historic times, in Tunguska, was about 50m diameter could have created waves, but probably not a tsunami. There is evidence that a much larger impact, he Eltanin impact, 2.1 ...


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Kuiper belt (and beyond) objects do sometimes come into the inner solar system: we call them "comets". However comets have a large proportion of volatiles (water etc) and the non-volatile matter tends to be in the form of small dust particles, neither of which form useful meteorites Ceres is also covered mostly in ice, so even if some was ejected ...


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In addition to the chemical composition and age of these meteorites mentioned in @Gerald's answer, there is another clue in martian meteorites that makes it very unlikely that these meteorites might come from another body: as the rock gets partially melted, re-solidified and ejected into space, small bubbles of gas get trapped in it. These gases trapped in ...


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