New answers tagged

1

I observed 1998 OR2 in a 30 cm telescope on 2020-04-28 around 02:00 UT. As predicted, its apparent magnitude was around 11, much too faint for the unaided eye. This Sky & Telescope article has finder charts, which indicate the correct position for the time I observed it. I prefer to see more faint stars on the map for positive identification, so I used ...


0

Based on this answer and sources therein, the absolute magnitude of an asteroid is given by $$M_{Abs} = 5 \left(\log_{10}(1329) -\frac{1}{2}\log_{10}(\text{albedo}) -\log_{10}(D_{km})\right)$$ where $D_{km}$ is the asteroid's diameter in kilometers, and the albedo (depending on the kind of albedo, is usually between zero and 1) is probably between 0.1 and ...


2

According to the page on The Sky Live the asteroid is currently at a visual magnitude of +11, which is also what Sky Safari says. It is not due to get much brighter so no, it will not be visible with the naked eye. According to the predicted light curve, there is a chance it will get to naked eye brightness (from a dark sky site) around April 2079.... So ...


Top 50 recent answers are included