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2

There are two distinct questions in your post. I'll answer the first one. There is a slight misconception in your question. A supermoon isn't just when the Moon is a periapsis, but when it is at periapsis during a full moon. Since the orbital period of the Moon is not the same as the time between two full moons, supermoons don't occur every month. (On a ...


8

The Moon's orbit about the Earth is only approximately elliptical. The Moon's orbit precesses both axially and nodally, and the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit varies. That the Moon's orbit precesses axially means that perigee sometimes occurs when the Moon is close to new, sometimes when it is close to half-full, and sometimes when it is close to full. ...


4

The moon's orbit is elliptical. This is what the moon's orbit looks like from above (A is the Earth, and C is moon, c is the orbit of the moon around the Earth) As you see with an eccentricity of 0.056 it doesn't get very close to Earth, but if you look carefully enough, there is some variation. The moon in the diagram is at apoapsis, as far from the Earth ...


2

Gravitational mass is not the be-all and end-all. Two other metrics are the Hill sphere and gravitational sphere of influence. These are widely used metrics that describe the volume over which a planetary body dominates gravitationally over than of the Sun. Saturn has a larger Hill sphere and a larger gravitational sphere of influence than does Jupiter. ...


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Earth, Moon and Sun relationships and the Moon’s movement around the Sun. An orbit is a modified helical path through the solar system. The depiction of an orbit as a complete circle is incorrect when viewing the solar system. When an orbit is around a parent body (Moon/Earth, or Earth/Sun) it is closed and ovoid in shape (2 Dimension). When it is a part of ...


0

Thanks to this answer linked by antispinwards I learned that such system most probably would not be stable, as I calculated it with proximity to upper limit of Hill sphere for each body. But, if instead, I would have taken distances closer to 1/3-1/2 Hill sphere, it could be theoretically feasible. The orbit of a satellite's satellite will be stable if ...


4

They might escape from the solar system, if the angles are right. If not, they'll probably wind up in elliptical orbits around the Sun. We'll use a simplifying assumption that the orbits are circular to make the calculations easier; All objects mentioned have orbital eccentricity of less than 0.05. The mean orbital velocity of Jupiter is 13.1 km/s, which ...


-1

The Moon’s path around the Sun IS in the form of an epicycloidal curve. The dictionary explanation of epicycloid is: ─ A curve traced by a point (the moon) on the circumference of a circle (moon’s orbit), rolling on the exterior of another circle (the arc of the extended radius of the sun) Where the point touches the other circle is the point of the new ...


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