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18 votes

According to this article the max mass of a non-spinning neutron star is around 2.5 solar masses. What is defined as a non-rotating neutron star?

The paper (arXiv version) actually finds a mass limit of $M_{\mathrm{TOV}}=2.25^{+0.08}_{-0.07}M_{\odot}$; it is believed that above this limit, subject to some caveats, a neutron star would further ...
HDE 226868's user avatar
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10 votes

What are the most up to date, accepted, evolution stages of big stars that end in compact objects or a planetary nebula?

It is now known, through a detailed study of the cooling times of white dwarfs in open clusters of known age, and through modelling of their progenitors, that white dwarfs arise from single main ...
ProfRob's user avatar
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9 votes

Can Neutron Star merger remnants solve the black hole mass gap? Why can't we observe them?

We can't observe the results of these mergers because they are either isolated black holes or they are isolated, massive neutron stars. In neither case is there anything to observe. Compact objects ...
ProfRob's user avatar
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9 votes

According to this article the max mass of a non-spinning neutron star is around 2.5 solar masses. What is defined as a non-rotating neutron star?

HDE226868's answer is fine and I won't repeat that. However, an answer to your headline question is that a non-rotating neutron star is effectively one where the rotation does not significantly alter ...
ProfRob's user avatar
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8 votes

About angular diameter, parallax and image of the nearest neutron star RX J185635-3754

With very few exceptions of the biggest and most nearby sources (like Betelgeuze with <~50mas) we cannot resolve the angular diameter of stellar-type sources by direct imaging means. Precision of ...
planetmaker's user avatar
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7 votes

About angular diameter, parallax and image of the nearest neutron star RX J185635-3754

All images of stars (bar one or two of the closest or largest) are effectively those of point sources. The image we see is the convolution of a point with the instumental "point spread function&...
ProfRob's user avatar
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6 votes

What are the most up to date, accepted, evolution stages of big stars that end in compact objects or a planetary nebula?

NASA has a great page, surrounding different stellar classes and their ultimate fates. If you want to learn about supernova types in specific however, this article by Astronomy.com is a nice summary ...
4NT4R3S's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

How long would we survive an approaching neutron star?

The following was too long for a comment, but I don't claim it is an answer. The first part is easy. At a relative velocity of 500 km/s, the neutron star will race, probably almost unperturbed, ...
ProfRob's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Why is nuclear pasta the strongest part of a neutron star?

The paper is discussing "strength" in terms of the shear modulus, which is the resistance of a material to shearing forces, not its resistance to compression. A shear modulus of $10^{30}$ ...
ProfRob's user avatar
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4 votes

Degenerate object accretion - what happens after it becomes a PMO?

You are hypothesising that accretion can occur "piece by piece" from a compact object. This may not be the case. In both the situations you have proposed I believe any accretion could be a ...
ProfRob's user avatar
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4 votes

About angular diameter, parallax and image of the nearest neutron star RX J185635-3754

The angular diameter doesn't come from imaging, but from photometry and spectroscopy. The observers estimated the surface brightness from the spectrum, and then computed how big the angular diameter ...
John Doty's user avatar
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1 vote

Lifespan of neutron stars and black dwarfs in terms of mass in years

The standard reference, although it is getting a bit old, is (Adams & Laughlin 1997). The main issue is that these objects either get absorbed by central black holes, or escape galaxies and then ...
Anders Sandberg's user avatar
1 vote

How would a cooled down neutron star look when illuminated?

Neutron stars are very smooth. According to Wikipedia, their maximum surface irregularities are on the orders of millimeters or less. As a neutron star cools and its luminosity decreases, most likely ...
Astrovis's user avatar
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1 vote

Can a Thorne-┼╗ytkow object be the progenitor of a modern quasi-star?

The problem is, the star would "literally" blow apart The problem is, modern stars tend to be way too small to even hold themselves together if the core collapses into a black hole. For ...
Alastor's user avatar
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