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I've just submitted a cropped section to Astrometry.net (that's astrometry, not astronomy). Click the "web" to upload an image and start the search, then take some time to read How (the heck) does Astrometry.net work? while waiting for it to compute... No quick solution. That doesn't mean that this isn't real, it's just that the first attempt didn'...


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tl;dr: You are seeing Astronomical twilight growing brighter through the month of August 2017 at the south pole! For more on the Moon's motion see the excellent answer to How does the Moon move in the "night" sky as seen from the poles? Here are two screenshots and a calculation of the altitude and azimuth of the Moon and the Sun throughout the ...


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That's a timelaps video, most likely created from a sequence of photos. It's easy to choose sensitivity and ISO settings on normal cameras such that the night sky at the darkest night is over-exposed. The moon light looks like sunlight - as it simply is reflected sunlight. E.g. see https://cloud.planetmaker.de/index.php/s/yJ7AXWG4dEC6csW - it's a an exposure ...


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While light pollution certainly makes things more challenging, there are a number of objects that tend to compete with light pollution well-enough to be enjoyed. I have done astronomy outreach events from urban parks (located in downtown metropolitan areas) where light pollution is extreme. Faint deep-sky objects typically can't be viewed without special ...


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For an object at about RA 6h and close to the celestial equator, viewed from 37 degrees N, it becomes visible in the early morning on about July 20th, and it is is visible at some point during the night until about May 20th, when it sets shortly after the sun. Between May 20th and July 20th it is not visible. (Determined Stellarium) An example of such an ...


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