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Following a reference to Darley et al., ApJ 746, 61 (2012) from your Wikipedia link gives a (very technical) discussion of nova progenitors, including distinctions between nova systems where the secondary stars are main sequence or supergiant stars, and distinctions among white dwarfs with different chemistries. The first sentence of that paper is A ...


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The real key, I suspect, was that observations of "postnovae" -- classical novae after the nova outburst, when the light from the outburst itself no long obscured light from the underlying system -- often showed clear characteristics of binary stars. This took the form of periodic dips in the light curve, suggestive of eclipses, or direct spectroscopic ...


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Any of these phenomena would be visible to the naked eye if they occured in the Milky Way, or a neighbouring galaxy (such as the Magellanic clouds) and was not obscured by dust. At the distance of stars, all of these would appear star-like. Supernovae have been seen, most recently in 1987, when there was a supernova in the Large Magellanic cloud. It had a ...


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A nova may leave behind a nova remnant: a shell of gas, expanding at about 1000km/s. In recurrent novae, they may be lit by light echoes from subsequent eruptions. They are much less massive than planetary nebulae, and at much lower energy than supernova remnants. Novae displaying nebula shells or remnants include: GK Per, RR Pic, DQ Her, FH Ser, V476 Cyg, ...


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