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As previously mentioned, most nebulous Deep Sky Objects are difficult to view with a traditional eyepiece. Electronic Eyepieces are a recent technological development that replaces the traditional eyepiece with a small camera. The cameras image is viewed on a monitor screen instead of through the eyepiece. These cameras are much more sensitive than the eye. ...


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There are several different quantities of this sort that you can define, and the definitions are fairly confusing. Hopefully the following diagram will make things clearer. Z <- future infinity / \ / \ / \ D C B A B C D <- now ...


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You're completely correct! The farthest we can see (in principle, not in practice) is called the particle horizon. Currently, the distance to the particle horizon is $d_\mathrm{P} \simeq 46\,\mathrm{Glyr}$, but as time goes on, light from more and more distant regions will reach us. If the Universe contains only "regular stuff" such as normal ...


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the expansion of the universe is relative to where it is being observed from. Much like dots on a balloon. Its easy to point to the center of the balloon (like what the picture shows) because it is only a 3d object. But for higher dimensions we don't have the spacial awareness to understand where than center of the universe is (if there even is one)


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That diagram does not depict the entire universe. At most, it depicts the history of what is now our observable universe (specifically, a 2D slice through it), with us at the center only because we're observing it. Someone at the furthest reaches of that portion of the universe would see us at the furthest reaches of their observable universe, and themselves ...


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