New answers tagged

5

I agree with @uhoh that you don't have to an expert, but above-average knowledge of coding is definitely useful, bordering on "a must". Not for writing huge programs with 1000s of lines, but for writing smaller pieces of code that help you in everyday tasks. As uhoh says, you can very well find your place in a group where other people are in charge of ...


5

There are several words to describe two celestial bodies being in the same place on the celestial sphere. A conjunction is when two bodies seem to pass close to one another, as seen from the Earth. A transit is when a celestial body passes between the observer (us) and a bigger body. For instance, Venus can transit in front of the Sun, when it passes ...


2

Can a material other than glass be used for making telescope mirrors? Yes! From this answer to Why are telescope mirrors made of glass? They are not always made of glass. In situations where mass counts and thermal variations can be large, optical telescope mirrors are sometimes made out of silicon carbide instead. From this answer to How are space ...


3

Front-surface glass mirrors weren't developed until the 1850s. Before that, the most common material was speculum metal, a high-tin bronze. Notable examples include Isaac Newton's 1668 prototype and William Herschel's late 18th century telescopes. Since speculum metal tarnished easily, it was common to have a spare mirror to continue observations while the ...


3

Good, fast , cheap -- pick any two. And here you need to add things like "machinable," "stable," "nontoxic." So, there are plenty of metal mirrors but they are much more prone to deformation than a nice rigid glass structure. There are mirrors of SiC (with overcoat, just like glass) for strength and thermal properties. There have been primaries ...


-1

One should consider the problem as relative position between EARTH and MOON only, irrespective of EARTH's tilt w.r.t. ecliptic. I am not able to put up a sketch here but would explain as-- Thus if we consider the geometry between EARTH and MOON, then as per my calculation as : The C to C distance = 383,000 km @ 5.145 deg inclined, Horizontal distance will ...


2

I created the house-states.txt.bz2 file in https://github.com/barrycarter/bcapps/tree/master/ASTRO/ to answer Period of unique horoscopes? and, according to this file, all 7 "planets" are in Leo during the following times: BCE 3440-SEP-01 01:14 to BCE 3440-SEP-01 05:19 BCE 1437-AUG-25 19:38 to BCE 1437-AUG-28 08:36 CE 5156-JUL-25 10:49 to CE 5156-JUL-26 ...


6

tldr; some modelling has been done with a lot more to do, but generally the impact of these constellations is fairly negative, but potentially manageable. Ok, there's a lot to unpack here. First things first, while people have been aware of Starlink and have thought of it, modelling the impacts to observatories hasn't happened as of yet in quite a few ...


8

I was the one operating the telescope at the time! I was using our 11 inch telescope fitted with a 1 MP MallinCam camera. The image was taken at 9:21 pm with a 25 second exposure.


2

The LSST Project is in charge of the construction project; building the telescope, camera and observatory and data pipelines and act as the "prime contractor". This includes designing and setting up the data processing and data distribution but the Project's job is essentially "done" once things start operating and the observatory transitions into regular ...


1

Interesting questions - I believe I have answers to them. You mentioned folding analysis - yes, you will need to do folding analysis to find pulsars - the majority of pulsars are found with what are called prepfold plots - here is some software that is very popular, but you can do this yourself. The general principle is that if you separate a signal at a ...


0

Firstly, a HR diagram is not the same thing as a CMD. A HR diagram is luminosity (or absolute bolometric magnitude) against effective temperature or a reliable proxy for effective temperature. Assuming no "user error", then the information you are giving us is that this star looks "hot" with the 275-606 colour, but cooler in the 438-814 colour. There are ...


0

Does the position of a star on a HR diagram depend on the magnitude system/color index used? Yes, of course. But note that HR diagram refers to a luminosity vs. effective temperature plot, while you're dealing with a color-magnitude diagram (or CMD). Why is this happening? First of all, you should check that it's not your fault. If you see unphysical ...


5

The optical pulsations of the Crab pulsar have been studied closely since 1969. The observations are actually not that difficult (I did some myself with a photoelectric photometer as a student) and have been achieved with a variety of technologies. A paper by Fordham et al. (2002) slices and dices the Crab pulsar's pulse shape into fine time and spectral ...


1

Today, astronomers never ever look through a telescope, so eyesight is more or less irrelevant. In the distant past, you needed good eyesight, unless you'd be a theoretical astronomer who'd rely on other people's observations. There weren't that many astronomers without good eyesight, I guess. A century ago, many astronomers did visual work so they needed ...


2

"Jocelyn Bell Burnell, who co-discovered the first pulsar PSR B1919+21 in 1967, relates that in the late 1950s a woman viewed the Crab Nebula source at the University of Chicago's telescope, then open to the public, and noted that it appeared to be flashing. The astronomer she spoke to, Elliot Moore, disregarded the effect as scintillation, despite the woman'...


0

In terms of "easier" - not really. There isn't anything made particularly easier or more optimal to measure. Theoretically, as you mentioned, "space stuff" like tiny planetoids or dust that are very close to the star itself might become more visible, but that's about it. However, the reason we would want to get measurements now is to compare them to data ...


8

Have there been any noted astronomers with bad eyesight who have made contributions? Wanda Diaz Merced: Astronomer Wanda Diaz Merced lost her sight in her early 20's when she was studying supernova explosions. Merced, fueled by her passion for the cosmos, found a way around her impairment. She discovered a way to hear the stars through sonification. ...


5

It should be obvious that the qualities of sight which benefit athletes, including wide field-of-view and extremely fast focal length adjustment, are irrelevant to astronomy. Prior to photographic capabilities coming into existence, there's some small case to be made for having excellent dark-adapted low light sensitivity, especially near the fovea. As ...


22

Johannes Kepler Wikipedia: "However, childhood smallpox left him with weak vision and crippled hands, limiting his ability in the observational aspects of astronomy." He made great use of Tycho Brahes great systematic observations in his theoretical work. He did not need exceptional eyesight for his developments in optics and telescopes.


11

I don't have a full historical perspective on this, perhaps someone could add more, but in the past an astronomer could formulate a hypothesis, design an observation schedule, and then hire and coordinate a group of people to cary out the observations and photographic plate exposures develop and analyze those plates measure and reduce the data and then ...


3

Even with better than average visual acuity, we still see only about 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum. Take a quickie look at Chromoscope and Planckoscope for a whiff of what we're missing -- and that is in just real-time here-&-now 7 mm clear aperture observation. No human eye ever saw a magnetic field, the swerves of space in time or veers of time in ...


Top 50 recent answers are included