31

There's no simple answer. In the immediate future, different radio telescopes around the world will pick up the slack in various ways; how that happens will depend on the needs of individual observers and collaborations. Unless someone was to build an identical observatory at the same latitude as Arecibo, with the same frequency range, receiver options and ...


15

Yes. The estimates are that LSST will produce about 10 million alerts per night (LSST Alert Distribution presentation) which will be at least a factor of 5x greater than the amount coming from ZTF currently. ZTF is an approximately 10% scale model of what the LSST alert stream will look as there is about 5x fewer alerts and the alert packets contain about 50-...


14

I'm pretty certain it is the 200inch Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory. There is an image galley of the 200 inch telescope. According to Richard Preston's book First Light: The Search For The Edge Of The Universe, Einstein attended the completion of the telescope truss, yoke and horseshoe bearing at Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company in ...


13

What you say is not quite true: the search for exoplanets is clearly intensive, but it is far from the only things astronomers are looking at. Most of the time, in two words, the situation is: resolution & wavelength. Whatever the field (if you are interested in galaxies, interstellar medium, stars and so on) you want more resolution, to resolve smaller ...


12

As you said, the loss of Arecibo will definitely put a dent in the field of radio astronomy. As for what will help take its place - there are a couple options. Green Bank Observatory has been and still is quite a widely-used radio observatory. It helps in many initiatives, not limited to but including Breakthrough Listen. I know there are many people who ...


9

Mostly general purpose laser pointers are used for pointing things at smaller distances eg. Diagram or Equations in Powerpoint presentations, so the power of such laser pointers is quite limited/restricted to 5mw ( Class 3A or IIIa) or 10mW in some regions. Because of the low power and small aperture of laser pointers if you point them through empty space, ...


9

You may know that a standard Newtonian telescope has two mirrors, they are called the primary and secondary mirror. The E-ELT has five mirrors: The quaternary mirror is simply "mirror number four", counting in the direction the light enters the scope. It's complex because that's where the adaptive optics sits: The quaternary mirror has an ...


8

The ideal shape for the mirror is round. It's the easiest to make. It's the best-behaved while in use. The hex tiles are already harder. The mirror is a revolution surface generated by a conic curve (circle, parabola, hyperbola, ellipse), which needs to be machined with a precision greater than 0.1 microns. That's extremely difficult already with a round ...


8

I'm not an observer, but there are a couple of quantities I know: seeing: is a measure of atmospheric turbulence and airmass. Its units are arcseconds and is the measured size of a point source, typically a star, as it appears in the image. In short: atmospheric turbulences shift slightly the position of the star, so if you observed it for long enought, the ...


8

I contacted Dr. Danielle Adams, Deputy Director for Marketing and Communications at the Lowell Observatory. She was kind enough to reply, and generously provided the following (lightly edited for formatting): I spoke with one of our senior educators about the Clark knobs. The numbers below correspond to the numbers in the image posted in Why does this ...


8

From the first article you linked: Taking the first 3,200-megapixel images of a variety of objects, including a head of Romanesco – a type of broccoli – that was chosen for its very detailed surface structure, was one of these tests. To do so without a fully assembled camera, the SLAC team used a 150-micron pinhole to project images onto the focal plane. ...


8

The big loss is to radar astronomy. Arecibo was one of only two radar telescopes in the world in regular use, and was by far the more powerful: a 300 meter antenna and megawatt transmitter, versus Goldstone's 70-meter antenna and 500-kilowatt transmitter. I'm not aware of any plans for successors: FAST can't be fitted with a transmitter without a complete ...


7

Amateur telescope and mirror maker here. Not sure if I qualify as a "citable source" but anyway, here it is: All metals will eventually tarnish. It may take a long time, but it will happen. The process is not entirely chemical always. Sometimes it's purely mechanical (abrasion). Other times it's in between. Surface phenomena are complex. Even gold-coated ...


7

Aluminium coating is a relatively recent process - it became available around the 1920s or 1930s. The Hale telescope arrived just in time to take advantage of this new technology. (It requires a reasonably good vacuum to work, which probably explains why it took a while to come along.) Before that - around the mid-1800s - various chemical "silvering" ...


7

The event was in 1937; the telescope began operating in 1948. If this Getty photo is the same scene from a different angle, then those with Einstein in the lower frame are, from left to right, Nobel laureate physicist and Caltech president Robert Millikan, and Westinghouse engineers Guenther Froebel and Jesse Ormondroyd. In the upper frame, between Froebel (...


7

Given that the article seems to be referring to NASA's Near Earth Object Program, it appears that there are five subprograms scanning the skies: Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) (four telescopes: 0.50 m, 0.68 m, 1.00 m, 1.50 m) Pan-STARRS (one telescope: 1.80 m) LINEAR (two telescopes: 1.0 m (retired), 3.5 m) Spacewatch (two telescopes: 0.9 m, 1.8 m) NEOWISE (one ...


7

"Unresolved" here means a source of light that appears as a point, not as a disc or a cloud. For example, the planets can all be resolved to discs by even quite moderate telescopes. Galaxies also can be resolved, they don't appear as point sources. However, stars, quasars, and most asteroids cannot be resolved by amateur equipment. In the context of the ...


7

Near the pinned location, at 24.0893°S 69.9306°W, Bing Maps shows a building like the one in the University of Antofagasta photos, with signs of recent construction. It's probably a matter of time until Google updates their satellite imagery in that region. The Minor Planet Center maintains a list of observatory codes with positional information. ...


5

For observing "predictable" transient events (e.g. Gamma Ray burst or gravitational wave events), observers apply (i.e. write a proposal for peer review) for "target of opportunity" (ToO)time in advance. Typically, you might say we expect LIGO to give us 2 reasonably located, strong GW events dutring the next semester and we would like 3 hours of telescope ...


4

It's a little hard to guess what research can be done there -- Today, Greenwich is close to the worst place on Earth to have an observatory: At sea level, in the light dome of one of the largest cities in the world, in a country famous for its clouds and fogs. The Wikipedia article on the observatory mentions the new telescope and says: In 2018 the Annie ...


4

Probably western red cedar, thuja plicata, especially if the observatory is in North America. Western red cedar is easily obtainable in North America. It has a light, red, wood that is particularly resistant to decay, and ideal for use in exposed positions. The soft red-brown timber has a tight, straight grain and few knots. It is valued for its distinct ...


4

The largest "robotic" (i.e., unmanned) telescope I'm aware of is the 2.4-meter Automated Planet Finder. Other large robotic telescopes include the 2.0-meter Liverpool Telescope and its copies (Faulkes Telescope North and Faulkes Telescope South). You can read about the automated control system of the Liverpool telescope here. These are all located at ...


4

This is a two part windscreen designed to minimize the effects of windshake on the telescope and to avoid the deterioration in image quality that wind would cause. The AAT is in a tall 6 story dome on a pretty exposed part of Siding Spring Mountain and so is likely more affected by wind gusts. Initially there were issues with the mount being too flexible and ...


4

That's the historic 24-inch Alvan Clark refractor. It was installed in 1896 and restored in 2014-15. Besides the moon mapping project, Percival Lowell used it to observe Mars, and Vesto Slipher used it for some of the first measurements of galaxy redshifts. Its current mission is education; in mild weather the observatory lets visitors look through it. ...


4

A list of "everything in the world" is difficult to create and also maintain: it needs both a dedicated maintainer as well as people who supply the maintainer with the information. Thus on the latter any list will fail for some cases. The most comprehensible list I know is the ESO-maintained list of observatories: https://www.eso.org/~ndelmott/obs_sites....


4

Question: What are the latitude, longitude and altitude of Ckoirama observatory? Is there a central location where coordinates like these can be looked up? I can confirm that there was a typo in our publication regarding the longitude and latitude of the Ckoirama observatory. They are in fact longitude = -69.93058889; latitude = -24.08913333; altitude = ...


3

Green laser pointers are great for astronomers because at the most common power output (5-15mw for consumer grade 500-532nm laser) the beam is visible in most "dark sky" settings. Cost for a simple green laser with a visible beam ~$15 Red lasers on the other hand have an average power output of about 3mw, most commonly denoted with the consumer in mind as, ...


3

Both are solar observatories, and so have different requirements from conventional telescopes. The sloping sides may allow for smoother air flow around the building, as heating during the day causes air to rise, which affects the resolution of the image. Also the pyramid is structurally strong (useful when you have a building on top of a mountain) and ...


3

I was fortunate enough to spend the past week at a workshop held at the Green Bank Observatory (GBO), so I can give you a partial answer based on how the Breakthrough Initiatives affects it in particular. Telescope time The GBO actually operates a selection of telescopes, of which the most widely-known (and largest) is the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The GBT ...


3

I assume that when considering where to view the Solar Eclipse from, you're looking for the place with the best observance of totality. This elicits two factors, the degree of totality and the time elapsed during totality. The best observed eclipse will be a total eclipse, i.e., 100% totality, and for the longest time possible. A map of the path of 100% ...


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