33

There's no simple answer. In the immediate future, different radio telescopes around the world will pick up the slack in various ways; how that happens will depend on the needs of individual observers and collaborations. Unless someone was to build an identical observatory at the same latitude as Arecibo, with the same frequency range, receiver options and ...


12

As you said, the loss of Arecibo will definitely put a dent in the field of radio astronomy. As for what will help take its place - there are a couple options. Green Bank Observatory has been and still is quite a widely-used radio observatory. It helps in many initiatives, not limited to but including Breakthrough Listen. I know there are many people who ...


11

Amateur astronomers regularly broadcast their viewing sessions over the Internet on the LiveSkies network. Pluto is within the viewing capabilities of most of the equipment used to broadcast but it just looks like a dim star that can be seen to move over long periods of time. https://www.liveskies.org/ Scroll down to the View As A Guest Link then click on a ...


10

The Faulkes Telescope project offers educational access to 2-m telescopes in the Canary Islands and Hawaii. Thanks to @PaulPrice for confirming my hazy recollection. I was observing at the Mt Stromlo 74 inch (1.9m) telescope in Canberra (long since incinerated in a bush fire) in the 1990s when there was a lunar eclipse. The observatory is at the top of a ...


9

The big loss is to radar astronomy. Arecibo was one of only two radar telescopes in the world in regular use, and was by far the more powerful: a 300 meter antenna and megawatt transmitter, versus Goldstone's 70-meter antenna and 500-kilowatt transmitter. I'm not aware of any plans for successors: FAST can't be fitted with a transmitter without a complete ...


7

Near the pinned location, at 24.0893°S 69.9306°W, Bing Maps shows a building like the one in the University of Antofagasta photos, with signs of recent construction. It's probably a matter of time until Google updates their satellite imagery in that region. The Minor Planet Center maintains a list of observatory codes with positional information. ...


6

The Lick Observatory on Mt. Hamilton in California has for years allowed the general public to view through their telescopes as part of their "Summer Series." Unfortunately, this is canceled this year due to COVID-19. According to the webpage, visitors can view through either the 36" Great Refractor and the 40" Nickel Reflector telescope. ...


4

A list of "everything in the world" is difficult to create and also maintain: it needs both a dedicated maintainer as well as people who supply the maintainer with the information. Thus on the latter any list will fail for some cases. The most comprehensible list I know is the ESO-maintained list of observatories: https://www.eso.org/~ndelmott/obs_sites....


4

Question: What are the latitude, longitude and altitude of Ckoirama observatory? Is there a central location where coordinates like these can be looked up? I can confirm that there was a typo in our publication regarding the longitude and latitude of the Ckoirama observatory. They are in fact longitude = -69.93058889; latitude = -24.08913333; altitude = ...


3

What are the latitude, longitude and altitude of Ckoirama observatory? You already found the latitude and longitude at Google maps: 24.0894 S, 69.9305 W. As far as the International Astronomical Union (IAU) is concerned, Google Earth / Google maps and GPS receiver coordinates are the only preferred sources for the location of an astronomical observatory. ...


1

I asked the at the minor planet center how the codes were decided, and the answer was Historically, the observatory codes were assigned ascending by longitude toward east (from prime meridian): 360 degrees were divided by numbers. When three digit numerical codes were not sufficient, letters plus two numbers were used again in bands toward the east. Some ...


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