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14

I'm assuming this is Pluto's equatorial plane. That is incorrect. Charon's right ascension of ascending node with respect to Pluto's equator is undefined. Seemingly paradoxically, it is well defined with respect to Earth's equatorial plane, and since that has become the universal plane of reference, that is what is used. Charon and Pluto are tidally locked ...


8

And we know that many of astronomers know that mercury orbit does not precess ... Mercury's orbit does precess, by a good amount. The greatest amount is explained by Newtonian mechanics. Venus, Jupiter, and to a lesser extent, all the other planets, make Mercury's orbit precess by over 500 arcseconds per century. A key problem of the latter half of the 19th ...


1

Start with some basic calculations. At any time, you can see a hemisphere, which is (gosh! :-) ) half of all space. This means that no matter what you do the average presence (lit or not) at any time is 1.5 moons. Since there's only one "sun," all moons present in the observable hemisphere will have an equal amount of the observable face illuminated. ...


1

A sidereal zodiac is not the same as the IAU constellations but corresponds more closely to them than the Western tropical zodiac does, e.g. the eastern edge of Virgo remains near Spica despite precession. I assumed equal 30° blocks of ecliptic longitude with the J285.25 equinox as origin (Lahiri ayanamsa). Your local tradition may differ slightly, but ...


1

Elliptic orbits with the focus at the centre of mass (the barycentre) are the solution to the "two body problem". The wikipedia page on the central force problem shows how the two body problem can be reduced to solving two central force problems. Therefore the elliptical solution to the central force problem also solves the two body problem, and in ...


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