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7

A planet that is not rotating with respect to the stars is not rotating. In your case this would give it a solar day length of 100 Earth-days. Such planets are not likely to exist in reality. This is in contrast to the actual case when a body is tidally locked, such as our moon. The moon rotates once per (lunar) month at exactly the same rate as it orbits ...


5

Venus has roughly the same gravitational potential as earth and the Venera probes successfully and softly landed there. Similarly, the Apollo space craft landed safely on earth on return. In both cases aerodynamic friction with the atmosphere can be used to get rid of excess velocity in order to enter orbit and eventually land. Thus landing will work cheaper,...


3

Closer than about 10000AU, 1.5 trillion km or about 2000 times the orbital radius of Jupiter. Three body systems are peculiar beasts, and but I'm going to change the question to "Would Jupiter be in a stable solar orbit?" This makes it a question of Hall radius. The Hall radius is $r_H = a\sqrt[3]{m/3M}$ where $m/M=1/4000000$ is the ratio of solar mass to ...


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