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1

Correct Answer: The Sun The earth doesn't orbit the barycenter of anything, this is due to a technicality in the terminology. Revolve = to move in a curved path round a center or axis Orbit = a path described by one body in its revolution about another To orbit, it requires one body moving around another. So while it is accurate to say that the Earth ...


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A quick search on Google brings us to https://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/factsheet/jupiterfact.html where it is mentioned that Jupiter’s tropical year lasts 4,330.595 Earth days and that the length of its day is 9.9259 Earth hours. Doing a little bit of math gives us the answer to your question… 4,330.595 × 24 = 103,934.28 hours 103,934.28 ÷ 9.9259 = 10,...


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You can't. An N-body system with n>2 is (in general) chaotic. This means that any inaccuracy in the initial state of the system will grow exponentially. You can't get a rough estimate of any planets position at a future time. So you can't predict roughly where a body will be a long way into the future, even if you numerically predict frame by frame. In ...


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Let's use coordinates where the center of mass is at the origin. Then in our two body system where the bodies are of equal mass, the center of mass is midway between the two bodies. So $$r_a = - r_b$$ The motion of the center of mass the weighted sum of the motions of the constituents, x, $$v_\text{center} = \sum m_x v_x/ \sum m_x$$ If we fix the center of ...


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Almost commented, but got too long... this is an anecdotal/layman type answer to attempt to compliment the other specific, informational(good), answers. So just on a really basic note; if there aren't any other large objects nearby/between them, what else would you expect to happen? Not to oversimplify but isn't this just a 'matter' of relativity.We expect ...


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2B or not 2b? That is the question. The published paper - Zhang et al. (2021) - defines COCONUTS 2b as an exoplanet based upon the mass-ratio of 2b/2A, which is of order 0.02. I think this is a bit arbitrary and it just looks like a wide, low-mass binary system, with a secondary that is a low-mass brown dwarf ($\sim 10 M_{\rm Jupiter}$). As the authors say, ...


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There are two major theories for the formation of wide-orbit exoplanets. This is discussed here: https://www.exoplanets.ed.ac.uk/news/formation-of-planets-on-wide-orbits The first major theory is called GI (Gravitational Instability). The theory is that a protoplanetary disk could fragment. Then the fragment could coalesce separately through gravitational ...


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