New answers tagged

1

I also asked this question at the History of Science and Mathematics Stack Exchange and got two answers so far. The answer by Ben Crowell makes a rough calculation that the displacement should be on the order of ten arc seconds. It also has a plot of the variation in longitude of the observed and predicted positions of Uranus over time, which seem to differ ...


0

Short Answer: A program for calculating the exact time of full Moon is a lot less expensive than the astronomical instruments necessary to observe when the Moon is exactly full. Long Answer: I can tell you that naked eye observation is pretty useless for telling whether the Moon is exactly full. When I was a child, I noticed the Moon in the sky one day, and ...


8

The reason the Moon doesn't orbit the Earth's equator is to do with the Laplace plane. This is the plane around which a satellite's orbit precesses: close to the planet, the equatorial bulge is the dominant contribution to the orbital precession, so the plane matches the equatorial plane. Away from the planet, the Sun is the main contribution. The transition ...


11

In addition to what @JamesK said, I would like to point out that the statement that the moon's inclination "somehow changes over time from 18° to 28°" is rather misleading. Even if the moon orbited the Earth in a perfect circle, in exactly the same plane as the Earth orbits the Sun (known as the ecliptic plane), you would seem to see the moon ...


2

That is part of this document: The Whole Chapter 8


33

The moon is so big that the processes that circularize and reduce the equatorial inclination would take much longer. The moon is big because of how it formed: a huge collision in the early solar system. (Unlike, say the Galilean moons that probably formed along with Jupiter, or Triton, that looks like a captured TNO) The other fact that makes its orbit ...


5

I believe you are right, this is extracted from the "Explantory supplement to the Astronomical Almanac (2006?)" (although it might date back to the 1960s...) For example a similar PDF document gives that citation. The supplement is published in a separate binding from the main astronomical almanc and a new version is published each year. Finding ...


4

This link even gives you the algorithm to calculate: link here Also, if you are comfortable with the VSOP, the VSOP2000 does have the moon data... the ephemerides can be downloaded from here


4

There is a python package called Skyfield that loads, reads and interpolates the binary forms of the JPL Development Ephemerides or DEs for you, and does everything else you need to get the absolute best results possible from them. If you can use even a tiny bit of python then this would be the way to go rather than trying to figure out how to interpolate ...


Top 50 recent answers are included