Hot answers tagged

17

This is called the Averted vision. It involves not looking directly at the object, but looking a little off to the side. How does it works? Because the retina is less sensitive at the center, and this is very remarkable on the very faint objects (like nebulas or galaxies) This is a common technique used by astronomers. More info here How to make the ...


7

The telescope you have is quite well regarded, and the eyepieces that come with it are of reasonable quality. If you can see the moon clearly, including craters and other features, then you should be able to see that the planets, particularly Jupiter and Saturn, are not like stars. At the very least they will look like disks, not points of light, and ...


6

Yes, there are exo-planets discovered in the Orion constellation, for instance, the stars HD 37605 and HD 38529 both have two known planets. HD 38858 is also interesting, as it has a known planet, and also a disk of comets.


4

Those targets are good choices for beginners at the right times of year. However, in June M42 is a daytime object, and M31 rises in the wee hours, leaving only M13 and Albireo in the evening. Other good summer targets include: M8, the Lagoon Nebula M11, the Wild Duck Cluster M57, the Ring Nebula Precise polar alignment is only required if you plan to take ...


3

If you have a Laptop or Notebook you can download one of several planetarium programs like Stellarium or Cartes du Ciel. They will display large areas of the sky that will help orient you initially. Zoom the computer view to match the view in your finder then zoom in again and get a view on the laptop that is close to the view in your eyepiece. Compare the ...


3

The effect you describe is called "averted vision". It works because the center of the retina is optimized for details. We use it for reading and anything that needs sharp vision. The other parts of the retina are more sensitive to light and and motion but not to detail Digital cameras are like this too. Having many tiny pixels makes for a sharp ...


2

Use a constellation map! That will provide much of the information you need. Here are however some things you can try to spot: On the lower left hand side of Orion, you can spot a very bright star, Sirius, in fact the brightest one in the sky. It is part of the constellation Canis Major (great dog). A bit further left and up you probably see a star nearly ...


2

(RV)-discovered planet around HD 38858, and then RV limits on undiscovered planets around HD 20794, 61 Vir (HD 115617), HD 69830, and HD 38858. http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~wyatt/kmmg15.pdf


2

The Astronomy Picture of the day for the 23rd November 2015 has all the neblosity around Orion, in fantatic detail. The result of 212 hour exposure.


1

After a bit of searching in Aladin. I found that the other star is V* V2170 Ori. By comparing their respective Simbad pages one can see the following: LL Ori is actually slightly further away. V2170 Ori has a GAIA parallax of 2.84 while LL Ori has one of 2.55. Simply using $D=1/p$, this translates to a distance of 0.35 kpc and 0.39 kpc LL Ori and V2170 Ori ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible