10

I certainly don't know the details of these kinds of calculations, but as my thought is a bit too long for a comment I'll write it up as an answer. If you measure the flattening of a planet due to rotation (e.g. by measuring its rotation period) and the gravity (measured while keeping the orbiter at constant height above the planet), then you have everything ...


4

Neptune and Uranus have estimated core temperatures of 7273 K and 5255 K respectively. Uranus and Neptune however likely do not have liquid water oceans. The combination of pressure and temperature on both planet results in unsuitable conditions for liquid water oceans. In fact for liquid water oceans to form on Neptune, it's predicted it would have to cool ...


3

Supernovas have a light curve going from normal to peak and back on the order of a month. Hence the spot would go from too cold to habitable and back very quickly. The same is true for stars passing the focal point: their motion (typically tens of km per second) makes the heated point move equally fast. Habitable zone denotes a region where a planet could ...


2

When the sun is about to rise for a given location is disk or photosphere is totally covered by the planet. The situation is similar to that of a total eclipse but we can't see the corona rising first because of two and at least overlapping reasons : the corona image undergo multiple diffusion and reflection and is not bright enough to contrast with the ...


2

If the sun is ever perfectly eclipsed as it is on Earth, then yes, the corona would be visible. The only reason we can't usually see the corona is because it is way dimmer than the rest of the sun. If the entire sun other than the corona is ever covered fully by another object, then the corona will be visible.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible