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I'm going to give you an intuitive answer. Keep in mind, this is not the "actual" answer, as the Hawking radiation is quite a bit more complex than the typical pop-sci explanation with virtual particles. But some intuitive justification is possible nevertheless. I don't see how this event contributes to evaporation of the black hole (, since the ...


9

These lecture notes address the issues to some degree, especially on slides 33-35. Because in the strongly warped spacetime near the horizon, virtual particles made from vacuum fluctuations turn out to have negative energy density. Energy density = energy per unit volume. These particles indeed have positive mass -- look at the one that ...


1

I don't know if the experts will agree with this description, but here is how I understand it: Both space and the event horizon are in constant quantum fluctuation. Essentially, the event horizon has tiny ripples. At points where the event horizon ripples up (above the average radius of the black hole), it has an above average amount of local energy. The ...


1

Let's look at the validity of tachyons first. Travelling faster than light, as said by userLTK, would create time travel, which would create the famous paradox, the tachyonic antitelephone. The tachyonic antitelephone is a violation of causality, and thus most likely, tachyons would not exist. Now, take a look at another assumption. Wikipedia is right ...


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