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Unmounted filters are just the bare filters which are designed to be put into slots in filter wheels (which have square or round recessed slots in them to hold filters). Mounted filters have a metal rim around them which holds (and slightly protects the edge of the filters) and typically have screw threads on them to enable them to be screwed into eyepieces. ...


3

Planets are very small objects. Getting a camera with a bigger sensor won't help you here. The 23MP of the Sony a6000 is already more than enough. Make sure you're capturing them when they're at their highest point and when the seeing is at its best. I like to check meteoblue. When the "arc sec" value is low, below 1.0, then you should get great ...


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A quick calculation tells us that a quasi-star with a radius of 10 billion kilometers (a figure suggested by the Wikipedia page) at 4.25 lyr (Proxima's distance from the Sun) would have an angular diameter of 1.7 arcmin, which is about three times Jupiter's. As a comparison, here from left to right there are the apparent sizes of the Sun, the quasi-star and ...


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tl;dr: While #JamesK says you can't, I'm pretty confident you can do it with a camera lens or telescope with a large aperture (10 to 15 cm) as long as it's pointed in the correct direction and moving to track the star during your exposure. Stars will be unresolved and so their apparent size will be determined by diffraction and astronomical seeing. Visible ...


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You can image Jupiter and Venus in daylight. You need to know where to point the telescope (as they won't be visible to the eye) so a "goto" system is useful. You won't be able to image the day sky as the night sky at any easily accessible wavelength. Just putting a red filter won't work, light at all wavelengths is scattered, making the stars ...


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