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2

(this is an incomplete answer: it doesn't provide a solution to the problem, but might result in a solution) Thanks to the USB vendor ID we were able to find the manufacturer, but unfortunately that didn't lead to any drivers. Browsing Meade's site from 2004/5 via Archive.org, I found an old downloads page and there's some software there which Archive.org ...


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(Much of this echoes what antlersoft says in their answer) For a phone photo through the eyepiece that looks about right to me! The size... the brightness... both are as I expect. What you could try is to use the manual mode of your phone's camera and set the ISO down to minimum (100) and the shutter speed down to something like 1/60s. Take a few shots, ...


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It's very difficult to get any kind of picture just holding your phone up to the eyepiece, and the picture you posted is overexposed and probably motion-smeared, but other than that it's what you'd expect. Planetary observation is a learned skill; planetary detail is usually very low contrast. Mars is a small target and you have to use lots of magnification,...


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Because the light is also redshifted towards infinite wavelengths as the falling object appears to approach the event horizon. The two things go together - the object appears to freeze at the event horizon according to a distant observer, but that means the frequencies of light they emit (according to the same distant observer) tend towards zero. So if you ...


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When the astronaut is far outside the black hole we can see the astronaut normally. As the astronaut falls towards the black hole, things get strange. We don't see the astronaut pass the event horizon, instead as the astronaut falls towards the event horizon, he will seem to be time dialated. The clock on his wrist will seem (from our perspective) to run ...


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I think that the other approaches are a lot easier and faster, but here is another approach. In case you know the approximate direction you pointed your camera, you can use planetarium software such as Stellarium to identify the stars: Set your field of view to be equal to the photo you took (in Stellarium, you can specify sensor size and focal length) ...


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From Pluto, the Sun is point-like to human eyes, but still very bright, giving roughly 150 to 450 times the light of the full Moon from Earth (the variability being due to the fact that Pluto's orbit is highly elliptical, stretching from just 4.4 billion km to over 7.3 billion km from the Sun). https://www.discovermagazine.com/the-sciences/bafact-math-how-...


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