New answers tagged

1

Before I tackle this problem, I will assume that the size of the planet is negligible compared to the size of the star, so I won't take into account partial transits. I will also assume circular orbits. I will also assume uniform random probability distribution of orbital revolution axes on the unit sphere. Suppose the orbital revolution axis of the planet ...


7

All modes can be used. But for bright targets, observations are limited to specific filters, subarrays, regions of the target planet, or spectral intervals. James Norwood and colleagues wrote a paper on this topic, although the full answer is complicated because of the "subset of the instrument modes" part. The simplest answer to understand is for ...


10

There are approved proposals for Cycle 1 to point the JWST at The Jovian system Jupiter's great red spot Mars Saturn and its moons and rings In those PDFs, they describe exactly what instruments they want to point where, but to summarize as far as I can tell they're planning to try to use pretty much all of the available instruments to image Jupiter and ...


1

The neutron collides with a nucleus, and it doesn't matter what atom or molecule that nucleus is part of. Collisions between particles of equal mass lead to more energy loss than collisions with a heavier particle, and therefore hydrogen nuclei slow down the neutrons the fastest. The method detects elemental concentrations, not chemical species. However, if ...


Top 50 recent answers are included